Judge: Paper money is "unfair" to the blind

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Little-Acorn, Nov 28, 2006.

  1. Little-Acorn
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    Little-Acorn Gold Member

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    I guess it was inevitable.

    Once the Fed govt decided it had to take cae of people with disabilities, and throw the weight of government behind efforts to protect them from their own problems, it was just a matter of time before the courts started rebuilding all of society to conform to their needs. No matter the cost, no matter the needs of the rest of society, no matter the Constitutional prohibitions against the Fed getting involved at all.

    Looks like one more step in that neverending process, is being taken.

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    http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/11/28/D8LMC4600.html

    Judge: Make Bills Recognizable to Blind
    Nov 28 6:10 PM US/Eastern

    By MATT APUZZO
    Associated Press Writer

    WASHINGTON

    The government discriminates against blind people by printing money that all looks and feels the same, a federal judge said Tuesday in a ruling that could change the face of American currency.

    U.S. District Judge James Robertson ordered the Treasury Department to come up with ways for the blind to tell bills apart. He said he wouldn't tell officials how to fix the problem, but he ordered them to begin working on it.

    The American Council of the Blind has proposed several options, including printing bills of differing sizes, adding embossed dots or foil to the paper or using raised ink.

    "Of the more than 180 countries that issue paper currency, only the United States prints bills that are identical in size and color in all their denominations," Robertson wrote. "More than 100 of the other issuers vary their bills in size according to denomination, and every other issuer includes at least some features that help the visually impaired."

    Government attorneys argued that forcing the Treasury Department to change the size of the bills or add texture would make it harder to prevent counterfeiting. Robertson was not swayed.

    "The fact that each of these features is currently used in other currencies suggests that, at least on the face of things, such accommodations are reasonable," he wrote.

    He said the government was violating the Rehabilitation Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in government programs. The opinion came after a four-year legal fight.

    Electronic devices are available to help blind people differentiate between bills, but many complain that they are slow, expensive and unreliable. Visually impaired shoppers frequently rely on store clerks to help them.

    "It's just frankly unfair that blind people should have to rely on the good faith of people they have never met in knowing whether they've been given the correct change," said Jeffrey A. Lovitky, attorney for the plaintiffs in the lawsuit.


    (Full text of the article can be read at the above URL)
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I heard about this, so much nonsense. I say let the blind mark their bills, much like the drug dealers do. I'm serious.

    I put my bills in order, not so hard.
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I bet Mr. Lovitky makes damn sure he gets the accurate amount of money for "helping" blind people.:thumbdown:
     
  4. BaronVonBigmeat
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    BaronVonBigmeat Senior Member

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    Eh, I don't think it's such a bad idea. It wouldn't be that hard to make our bills in six different lengths. In fact it might save a slight amount of money if the $1 and $5 notes were smaller. If the government got out of the business of creating and controlling money, we'd probably already have private companies (Visa, Mastercard) issuing more user-friendly notes than what we have now. Plus, they'd almost certainly be backed by something of value.
     
  5. MissileMan
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    MissileMan Senior Member

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    Any idea what kind of headaches bills of different lengths would cause businesses that are highly dependent on bill validation?
     
  6. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    It would require an ammendment. The Constitution grants sole minting powers to the federal government.

    Not to mention that it's a bad idea. Money serves as a universal medium for trade. If private companies made money, competing companies would all be competing to make sure their currency was stronger. The price would fluctuate so much, it would make your head spin. It works internationally because each country only accepts one, maybe two forms of currency standard (with a possible third, thanks to the Euro). With private companies making currency, there'd be a good 4+ currencies in this country, with exchanges getting out of control.
     
  7. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    U.S. District Judge James Robertson is another Clinton appointed Judge.

    Another liberal wacko imposing liberalism from the bench
     
  8. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    Electronic money --- coming soon to a society near you...

    Paper money, and hard currency are destined for the dustbin of history.

    It is just a matter of time before we will be using something like a credit card for every purchase.

    Electronic money is more secure than paper money, it can't be counterfeited and is difficult to steal.

    The flow of cash will be increased with the use of electronic money, since transactions will go directly from the buyer's bank account to the seller's.

    Of course, every financial transaction, even vending machine purchases, will be traceable. And of course, that has a sinister side.

    But, I believe that it is inevitable.
     
  9. 90K
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    90K BANNED

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    Isn't this subject a little too old to be making a fuss over? I mean like say a hundred years too late to answer? I lived in Japan and they had these dots on the edges of the Yen bills to identify the denomination of course they have 3 bills anyway 1,000-5,000 and 10,000 yen notes pretty simple.
     
  10. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    And have to go through the expense of replacing all ATMs and automatic cashiers. Why don't the blind people just use debit cards? I mean, seriously, where are debit cards NOT used these days? I hardly ever have cash, myself.

    **Edit: Karl, you beat me to it! :)**
     

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