Jobs Resistant to Offshore Outsourcing

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Adam's Apple, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Interesting perspective about jobs and future offshore outsourcing.

    Managers and Executives, especially those able to manage projects with remote employees, especially those in Asia and Latin America.

    Protective Services Occupations: correctional officers, firefighting, police and detectives, private detectives and investigators.

    Sales. Some of the best sales jobs will be in financial services, health care products, and in selling into China and India

    Government jobs. Wide-scale offshoring of government jobs would be political suicide.

    Health care. Most direct health care and hospital administration jobs can’t be offshored.

    Technicians. Installing, servicing, and repairing large machines such as printing presses, robotic welders, and MRI machines.

    Food service: servers, chefs, managers.

    Construction trades: for example, electrician, plumber, crane operator, heating/ventilation/air conditioning speclalist.

    Entertainment. Performers, directors, producers and technical staff.

    Teachers.

    For more information on the above careers, see www.bls.gov/oco.

    Well-above-average employees in nearly all fields. Even in offshore-prone fields, some jobs will remain in the U.S. but will go primarily to those who are exceptionally capable, hardworking, or extraordinary networkers.

    for full article:
    http://www.martynemko.com/pub/articles/offshore-resistant-careers.shtm
     
  2. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    These are definitely in demand, AND make quite a bit for salaries. I am hoping to encourage my sons to take up trades rather than office jobs because there will always be demand, and the skills are invaluable.

    Tim makes more than the average office position, and he has never been to college or even trade school. He got into the blue collar career straight out of high school, learned his skills on the job. When he applied at the company he is at now, he submitted an application on a Wednesday morning, interviewed Thursday, and was offered the job at 8am Friday morning. They helped him get his class A license, and now if he ever decides to leave this company (which won't be for many years, because they are good to their employees), he has that leverage. His supervisor is looking to move into office work within the next year because he is getting too old for manual labor. Tim is the next one in line to be promoted to that position, which would bump his title to Foreman, and he would be in charge of the entire West Minneapolis metro area. And he only turns 26 next month.
     
  3. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Glad to hear your husband was able to get such a good job. He's fortunate. Not many of those good jobs around anymore.
     
  4. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    well, likely because now many companies are asking people to have vocational training or be certified in certain areas, but still. Manual labor jobs, specifically in construction, pay big bucks if you stick with it and are willing to cross-train yourself. Plus, the union that he is in (this is a pretty good one) offers free classes and training in other fields they support. If Tim gets laid off this winter, which is possible, he can take classes like brick/masonry work, pipelaying, and stuff like that.

    These jobs aren't hard to find, you just have to be willing to work hard, mostly outdoors in all sorts of weather, and often work long hours. Tim's average day in the summer is 10-12 hours, but he is used to it. Plus the money is nice when he gets paid. AND...he gets a very nice tan in summer, and is REAL buff... :banana:
     

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