Jack London, Secularist

Discussion in 'Politics' started by PoliticalChic, Nov 10, 2012.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    This is political because 'secular' is a defining characteristic of Liberalism. This post is a piece in the larger puzzle of contemporary society. So....Jack London, Secularist


    1. “At the age of ten the boy was on the street selling newspapers to supplement the familiy's meager income. For fourteen years thereafter — until his first writing success at twenty-four — life was one vicious, downward cycle of toil, escape, toil, escape, toil. He became a "work beast" laboring in a cannery, a jute mill, a laundry, and shoveling coal in a power station. He worked for ten cents an hour, thirteen to fourteen hours a day, six and seven days a week. Is it any wonder that he saw life in terms of man's unending struggle against a ruthless nature?”
    A Short Biography of Jack London With Color Pictures





    2. A best-selling author, Jack London was the best-known representative of literary naturalism, selling a secular worldview along with his art. Naturalism aligns humans with the evolutionary scheme of things, i.e., the individual does not really matter, and has no intrinsic worth beyond the single task that nature assigns every organism: to reproduce so that the species will survive. Therefore, there is no higher purpose beyond sheer biological existence.

    3. Humans are portrayed as common biological organisms, having no real freedom of action, chained to predetermined actions by their genetic heritage and social environment. Nancy Pearcey, “Saving Leonardo,” page 144.

    4. More than anyone else, Jack London integrated an evolutionary worldview into American fiction. In one tale, he wrote: “It was easy. All men must die…. It was the law of all flesh. Nature was not kindly to the flesh. She had no concern for that concrete thing called the individual. Her interest lay in the species, the race…. The old men he had known when a boy, had known old men before them. Therefore it was true that the tribe lived,… It was the same everywhere, with all things…. He remembered how he had abandoned his own father on an upper reach of the Klondike one winter,…” The Law of Life (The World of Jack London)





    5. There is no morality. No care or concern for other, or for life. Nor is any required. This is the gift of the Enlightenment, with its view to replacing religion with science, with reason. Here it is today, explained not by Jack London, but by former Obama czar Steven Rattner:
    “Well, maybe not death panels, exactly, but unless we start allocating health care resources more prudently — rationing, by its proper name — the exploding cost of Medicare will swamp the federal budget.” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/17/opinion/health-care-reform-beyond-obamacare.html





    6. Our ‘brave new world’ isn’t brave, or even new. Darwin’s thesis was offered in 1859, and wasn’t revolutionary in that other versions had been proposed long before Darwin….but those versions had presumed God, or a Mind of some kind behind the evolutionary process, directing some goal or purpose. Instead, they “imply that, far from having a divinely scripted role in the drama of life, our species is the accidental and contingent result of a purely natural process.” Seeing And Believing | The New Republic





    7. Yet, in the most obvious way, we are not at all similar to other organisms.
    Sir John Maddox, editor emeritus of the foremost journal of science, "Nature," wrote in a classic Time magazine essay:
    “How the brain manages to think is a conundrum with a millennial time scale. All animals have brains so as to be able to move about. Signals from the senses- eyes, ears, nostrils, or skin, as the case may be- send messages to the spinal cord, which moves the limbs appropriately.
    But thinking involves the consideration of alternative responses, many of which have not been experienced but have been merely imagined. The faculty of being conscious of what is going on in the head is an extra puzzle.” (“Thinking,” March 29, 1999, p. 206)
     
  2. Thunderbird
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    If men are just accidents, just a collection of chemicals, why do they deserve respect or rights? This is the secular mindset that is so useful to tyrants.
     
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  3. Katzndogz
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    Jack London was a communist who died of kidney failure due to a morphine overdose. Some say he committed suicide. He was also a racist who wrote quite a bit about the Yellow Peril as a result of Chinese immigration. They certainly had no such thing as human rights.
     
  4. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    The call of the wild was a good story. I don't care about his political leanings.
     
  5. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    I believe I can change your mind, El....

    1. I'll bet you're familiar with 'A Clockwork Orange.' Remember the treatment that Alex received to alter his behavior?

    2. Now, that may be far too blatant in this connection....but it's in the ballpark. Behavior and thought process can be changed.

    3.Then there is the more subtle 'subliminal stimulation,' messages flashed on screen just below a parson's consciousness of the message....
    ...it works.

    4. Get the idea? Well, I agree that London's work is exciting and the work of a talent....but
    when you say 'I don't care about his political leanings,' I'd agree with you if that included '...since I know what he is trying to do.'

    5. There are lots of similar examples in the arts, as most artists are Left-leaning. When people don't realize that they are being 'instructed,' it is more difficult to resist the message.

    Don't you agree?
     
  6. Moonglow
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    I can understand the meaning, but it doesn't mean I will follow it. Art is more fantasy than reality.
     
  7. Dot Com
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    Dot Com Nullius in verba Supporting Member

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    I like this reasoning :)
    Jefferson's Religious Beliefs « Thomas Jefferson
    I'm a secularist too.
     
  8. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    No, it doesn't...but when unaware of the purpose, and it is produced at many levels, and from many sources....it does prove effective.

    This has been well-known and well-instituted by the Left.
    Recall when the Obama administration co-opted the NEA?

    "I am by no means opposed to partisanship in poetry as such," wrote Engels. "Both Aeschylus, the father of tragedy, and Aristophanes, the father of comedy, were highly partisan poets, Dante and Cervantes were so no less, and the best thing that can be said about Schiller's Kabale and Liebe is that it represents the first German political problem drama. The modern Russians and Norwegians, who produce excellent novels, all write with a purpose. I think however that the purpose must become manifest from the situation and the action themselves without being expressly pointed out and that the author does not have to serve the reader on a platter the future historical resolution of the social conflicts which he describes." (Marx and Engels, "On Art and Literature," p. 88.)
    (emphasis mine)
     
  9. Thunderbird
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    More quotes from Jefferson:

    "God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God?"

    "I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ."

    And here's Benjamin Franklin:

    "Here is my Creed. I believe in one God, the Creator of the Universe. That He governs it by His Providence. That He ought to be worshipped. That the most acceptable service we render to him is in doing good to his other children. That the soul of man is immortal, and will be treated with justice in another life respecting its conduct in this. These I take to be the fundamental points in all sound religion, and I regard them as you do in whatever sect I meet with them."
     
  10. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Those who have studied Jefferson are regularly able to find quote to substantiate both sides of many arguments.....

    ....much like the Bible.
     

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