CDZ Is Police Misconduct and Child Abuse-Neglect Intertwined?

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by AveryJarhman, Nov 28, 2015.

  1. AveryJarhman
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    AveryJarhman Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
    (Brooklyn's Marcy Houses - undated photo)

    Hello. After spending twelve years in the 80s-90s providing police services to the Brooklyn community Shawn Jay Z Carter raps about using his semi-auto "Mack Milli' to dominate and cause fear to peaceful people for the purpose of protecting his gang's 24/7 drug operation, it was fear for my personal safety that finally drove me from a community, that because I spent so much time there, I considered my second home.

    Sadly, I have few doubts that some Americans fail to perceive or willfully ignore some reasons for why at times, police are less than professional or act in a manner inconsistent with their scope of employment.

    Not that I believe police acting outside the scope of their employment is acceptable, I just understand that witnessing on a daily basis - violence, people's lack of respect for each other as well as our laws, sadness, children emotionally scarred by their immature single-moms; doomed to a life of struggle and hardships - can have detrimental effects on many people born or imbued with a sense of sympathy, empathy and respect for others.

    Some officers recognize they are burnt, they no longer feel a desire to serve a community that has diminished their faith in the goodness of human kind, a community that constantly has them in self-protection mode whenever they are working in the community, or even commuting to and from the community in their private cars.

    These officers intelligently seek a transfer to a more stable community, while others remain, mostly because of established friendships with colleagues, allowing and in some cases not realizing the emotional pain they experience from witnessing human suffering on a daily basis is insidiously eating away at them, and at times affecting their professional conduct and in some cases their emotional well being.

    During the hiring process we subject police candidates to psychological exams to insure they are normal stable people. Then we place these normal, stable people into an environment they are totally unaccustomed to, often dangerous environments, and we expect them to remain normal people when they are constantly and justifiably told by their supervisors to be safe, while reading crime reports that indicate they are not safe.

    Sure, these officers are not in a war or battle, yet the chances for stumbling upon a gunfight or being attacked for no reason are greater in a community with a general flavor for lawlessness.

    One sunny afternoon I was at the scene of a shooting, surrounded by dozens of civilians and a dozen or more cops, when a second person was shot no more than one hundred yards away. Tell me that would not give you goosebumps.

    This anecdote is a tip of the iceberg.

    One afternoon I'm on my way home stopped at a traffic light when gunfire erupts, three men carrying handguns run by me, enter a waiting town car.

    Risking my safety I follow in my pvt car attempting to learn more about the suspects as they unobtrusively leave the scene. They stop at a house about ten blocks away, me not being a hero willing to confront three armed men with my two-inch six shot revolver, spend several minutes trying to locate a working payphone to report my observations.

    Heading back to the scene I learn the three people shot, their neighbors who at the time of the shooting were hanging on their front stoops, provided the police with NO information about the shooting or the shooters, I was the only witness to come forward, and it isn't even my community.

    While at the scene, the same town car I observed picking up the shooters several minutes earlier, arrives back on the scene operated by a man we detained and soon learned was wanted for a totally unrelated shooting that occurred a few weeks earlier.

    Driving home that night I asked myself, "Why do I do this? Five, sometimes six days a week making this long drive, placing my safety at risk for people who either hate me, or people justifiably afraid and equally fearful of the people who hate me."

    A few days later I went to my CO and requested a transfer, advising him, "Lou, I've had enough of the nonsense, it's time for me to go."

    Within a week he hooked me up with a transfer to a more stable community, closer to home. A community where fewer people viewed me as the enemy, and many actually openly appreciated the police, sharing words of appreciation often harshly frowned upon by many in the Brooklyn community I was forced to abandon, due to my level of fear that gradually built up and intensified over a period of nearly twelve years.

    I knew when I had enough of the emotional turmoil I experienced from witnessing mayhem and violence on a daily basis. I made the intelligent choice to protect my emotional well being by leaving this Brooklyn community which was the cause for my fear and anxiety.

    Unfortunately some cops ignore the signs of stress and anxiety, indicating that it is time for a change of venue, instead choosing to remain in their second homes where they have built friendships and bonds.

    I fear nothing will change until Americans honestly recognize that bringing children into our world without first acquiring the skills to properly love and nurture a child, or having the skills or means to independently provide for a child's upbringing, may result in a child growing up filled with anger and frustrations, needing to vent those emotions, sadly, not in a constructive manner.

    This is a social/human behavioral problem I've witnessed happening for decades in some/many American communities.

    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately for police, they are tasked with coping with the anger and frustrations of children irresponsibly introduced to our world by people who had no socially accepted right making babies before acquiring the skills, PATIENCE and means to provide their developing newborns, infants, toddlers, children and teens with a safe, fairly happy American kid childhood.

    Sadly, Baltimore Mom of The Year is a perfect example of a immature teen girl irresponsibly building a family that she subjected to a early life of pain and struggle.

    [​IMG]

    Ms. Toya Graham, is not alone. She is only one of countless teen girls and women who in my opinion are responsible for populating our prisons with depressed, angry, frustrated, unpredictable, sometimes suicidal teens *(NY Times May 18, 2015 - Rise in Suicide by Black Children Surprises Researchers)* filled with resentment for being introduced to a life of pain, though unwilling to blame their moms and or dads for making selfish choices that negatively impacted the quality of their young lives.

    To be clear, I am not suggesting Child Abuse and Neglect are the only factors for police acting outside the scope of their employment.

    However, I honestly believe that reducing Child Abuse and Neglect will not only reduce the number of African American children committing suicide, reducing Childhood Abuse and Neglect will result with fairly happy children maturing into fairly happy teens and adults who will find more constructive activities to pursue, rather than anti-social activities that emotionally and/or physically harm their peaceful neighbors and police who try to protect peaceful people from harm.

    The question all concerned, compassionate Americans should seriously be asking ourselves, our elected, civil, social, community and religious leaders is, what real, substantial changes in our society's attitude and laws need to occur to prevent abuse that often causes young kids to mature into depressed, frustrated, angry teens and adults as a result of experiencing the *emotional and/or physical trauma of an abusive childhood?*

    Black *(Children's)* Lives Matter; Take Pride In Parenting; *End Our National Epidemic of Child Abuse and Neglect*; End Community Violence, Police Fear & Educator's Frustrations
     
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  2. Fishlore
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    Fishlore Silver Member

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    Cops and soldiers are government employees who responsibility it is to exercise the state's monopoly on violence. It is not an easy job and we owe a debt of gratitude to those who do the job well, a debt which all too often is not fully repaid.

    As citizens we must not let our emotional response to the services of the police or the military blind us to the sad reality that both cops and soldiers all too often serve as the instrument social injustice and national aggression. These enforcers of wrong government policy don't make that policy but they are the rubber that meets the road.

    Just as the enforcers don't create the unjust policies, neither can they cure them. Cops' and soldiers' first duty is to obey orders. Questioning those orders is never encouraged and can be a big mistake. We should do whatever works to free our society of bad cops and bad soldiers but we must recognize that tweaking the training of our paid enforcers is not going to cure us of our sins. The heart of the problem isn't the enforcers, it is us.
     
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  3. 320 Years of History
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    320 Years of History Gold Member

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    I think they are intertwined insofar as abused kids who later become cops will misconduct themselves. I think those are the cops who get on a "power trip" once they acquire a shield and gun.
     
  4. AveryJarhman
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    AveryJarhman Gold Member

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    Hi, Fishlore, thank you for publishing an intelligent reply.
     
  5. 320 Years of History
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    320 Years of History Gold Member

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    I generally agree with your comments, but I don't feel your remark about following orders fairly presents whether those personnel, particularly members of the U.S. military, are encouraged to follow orders. After all, the oath taken upon joining the armed forces is:

    I,____________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice.​

    Yes, they must obey orders, but it is incumbent upon military personnel to consider whether the orders they are given are lawful and disregard those orders that they determine are not. "Lawful" and "agree with" aren't the same things, and that's so whether one is in the military or not. Now whether or not the military makes available to its personnel the tools/information necessary to determine (or build up awareness of) what is and is not legal is something I don't know happens or doesn't happen.
     
  6. Fishlore
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    Fishlore Silver Member

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    Your point about unlawful orders is a good one but it is largely theoretical in practice. Sure, if some young Second Lieutenant orders the platoon to storm into the local supermarket and kill everyone inside, he is going to be taken for medical attention by a couple of sergeants, but anything less obvious may be a different story. Think of My Lai or Abu Ghraib. From the first day, boot camp doesn't do much to encourage independent thinking about orders.

    Early in my ROTC career I was reprimanded by my DI. " But, I thought ..." I started to say. "You thought?" he roared, "who ordered you to think?" Those lessons stay with you.
     
  7. 320 Years of History
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    320 Years of History Gold Member

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    I get what you mean; moreover, I never received a military commission, so I don't have your firsthand experience. It's clear to me from having worked with military officers (they were active duty; I was a consultant) -- some combat commanders, some business operations, some attorneys -- that thinking is among the things they are expected to do, and do well. Why you got that sort of response from your DI I cannot say.

    I don't know at what point thinking becomes expected, but I'm surprised that the skills required to do so well aren't among the things taught and allowed to be exercised as early as one's ROTC experience. I do know that thinking is among the skills whereof the longer one waits to begin doing it, the longer it'll take to be good at doing it.
     
  8. Fishlore
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    Fishlore Silver Member

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    ROTC at an Ivy League university had and still has ample room for serious thinking and scholarship. The drill field is not one of the places where thinking or scholarship take place.

    The reason is brutally simple and can be understood without military experience by anyone who has enjoyed the game of football. There is need for thoughtful analysis on the bench. There is benefit in hearing views in the huddle, but once the ball is snapped, the only thing in the player's mind should be his job and how to do it best.

    There are times when every cell in your brain screams, "NO! I don't want to die!" At times like those, thinking about the legitimacy of the order cannot be tolerated. When the only alternatives are obey or run away, discipline is vital, analysis is not. It is brutal and decidedly undemocratic. ROTC taught me that "in the U.S. Navy, we protect democracy, we do not practice it." The military is not a model for our society.
     
  9. 320 Years of History
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    320 Years of History Gold Member

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    No question there. I would sure hope there's "ample room...for thinking" at college; that's the key reason for one's being there. LOL

    Everything has an appropriate time and place.
     
  10. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    OK, there are bad people of every stripe, color and uniform out there. A murder is a murder, no matter who commits it. There, does that make you feel better? How about more talk regarding social justice, institutional racism, diversity training, blah, blah, blah... Does that solve the problem? NO

    The reality is that we now have legions of young Black thugs who taunt police with semi-criminal behavior every chance they get just to see what might happen. Taking risks is part of male adolescent behavior, but when it is combined with social endorsement, the results are often deadly.

    Black Lives Matter is simply the latest and greatest snake oil being sold to young Blacks as a cure for their lack of self worth, which stems from the dysfunctional subculture in which they are raised. Regardless of the cause, the cure must begin at home.
     

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