Is Our Industrial Base a Security Issue?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by William Joyce, Jan 25, 2007.

  1. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    It's common knowledge that America doesn't make stuff anymore. China does. For the liberals, this isn't a problem because they don't care what happens to America anyway. For many conservatives, this is just 'the free market' at work, and nothing to worry about.

    I worry.

    If all our stuff, from clothes to simple electronics, is made overseas, what happens when we get into hostilities with those places? China's a great example.

    I also just think it's weird that we don't make things. It seems unhealthy somehow... like relying on illegals to do ALL your menial jobs.

    I know there are obstacles and most solutions are what they'd call "protectionist measures," but isn't it worth looking into?
     
  2. glockmail
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    glockmail BANNED

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    I think it would be a problem if we lost all our steelmaking, automotive, truck, aircraft, and related industies. Same with the resource supplies of ore and fuel. But I think that's a long way from happening. The steel and automotive industries are very cheap in China and such, because they have newer factories, basically zero environmental regulation and peasant labor. Our steel and automotive has been forced to downsize and abandon older plants, but they could be upgraded and expanded to war capacity fairly quickly.

    Plus you need to consider that we don't fight with the huge armies like we did in WW2. We fight with a realtively few high tech planes, tanks, and such instead of huge armadas of destroyers and such. Precision tactics means that we can destroy an enemy by using much less ordnance.
     
  3. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    I'm worried too....am I not a conservative? :eusa_doh:
     
  4. Darwins Friend
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    Civilian items going overseas for manufacture doesn’t bother me in the least.

    The consumer dictates that reality. It is the Wal-Marting’ of our country.

    Even to the point of producing commercial aircraft in China – with the economic realities of twenty five people being employed for every person in our Boeing plant, with zero benefits or any type of supposed job security.

    What might disturb me is advance weapon systems being produced overseas. Even the software that controls them – even by people we import from India or elsewhere to produce such sensitive products.

    Our government should analyze each and every plant closure here in the U.S. and insure that the tools (both material and employee) are retained and even subsidized, to keep our dangerous stuff within our nation.

    Kid’s toys for Christmas is one thing – missile guidance chips are another.
     
  5. William Joyce
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    William Joyce Chemotherapy for PC

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    I guess I was being more domestic-good focused on that one. Probably most mainstream conservatives would have a problem with the military hardware capability loss discussed by DF.
     
  6. trobinett
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    trobinett Senior Member

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    First, let me say, I believe, and support the free market concept, but only in its "true" form. The United States whole goods producers seldom compete on a "level playing field" with their overseas competitors. Thanks in part to oppressive government regulations, and the subsidizing, that is provided by foreign governments to their whole goods products.

    Looks to me that WJ's concerns are the same as my concerns. Being able to react to the needs of a nation at war, and not having to rely on our trading partners for help for critical war material, and technology.

    A "balance" must be achieved between what is beneficial in the short term, as compared to what is beneficial over the long term.

    At this point, our economy, though strong, is NOT in balance, and like WJ, THAT makes me nervous.
     

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