Is Bush losing his conservative base?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by DKSuddeth, May 20, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    novak article

    During George W. Bush's keynote address to the 40th anniversary black-tie banquet of the American Conservative Union (ACU) last week, diners rose repeatedly to applaud the president's remarks. But one man kept his seat through the 40-minute oration. It was no liberal interloper but conservative stalwart Donald Devine.

    As ACU vice chairman, Devine was privileged to be part of a pre-dinner head-table reception with President Bush. However, Devine chose not to shake hands with the president. Furthermore, he is one of about 20 percent of Republicans that polls classify as not committed to voting for Bush's re-election.

    The conventional wisdom portrays the latest Zogby Poll's 81 percent of Republican voters committed to Bush as reflecting extraordinary loyalty to the president by the GOP base. Actually, when nearly one out of five Republicans cannot flatly say they support Bush, that could spell defeat in a closely contested election. When Don Devine is among those one out of five, it signifies that the president's record does not please all conservatives.

    In a time of crisis in Iraq, Bush spent more than an hour at the J.W. Marriott Hotel Thursday night to celebrate the ACU's anniversary and woo his conservative base. His speech was crafted to evoke the maximum response from that audience. There was no mention of either "compassionate conservatism" or "no child left behind "

    Why, then, did Devine dismiss a consciously conservative speech as "long and boring"? At age 67, Devine has spent a lifetime as a party regular and faithful conservative. I first encountered him some 30 years ago when, as a University of Maryland political science professor, he was adviser and strategist for conservatives in rules fights at Republican national conventions. Directing President Reagan's Office of Personnel Management, he was one senior administration official who took seriously the Reagan Revolution. He was a political adviser in Bob Dole's presidential campaigns and ran himself for Congress and statewide office in Maryland.

    So, the question remains: Why would Devine stay seated at the ACU dinner when everybody else was standing and clapping? To begin with, he shares concern with many Republicans about what the U.S. is doing in Iraq and where it is going. Businessmen I have talked to recently exercise limited patience in how long they will tolerate the bloodshed and confusion.

    What most bothers Devine and other conservatives is steady growth of government under this Republican president. If Devine's purpose in devoting his life to politics was to limit government's reach, he feels betrayed that Bush has outstripped his liberal predecessors in domestic spending. A study by Brian Riedl for the conservative Heritage Foundation last December showed government spending had exceeded $20,000 per household for the first time since World War II. Riedl called it a "colossal expansion of the federal government since 1998."
     
  2. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    Interesting read, but the author writes in an awful biased (read, supporter of the left or far, crazy ass, nut-wing right [how's that?]) way. First off, I have never heard of the man in which he is righting about, so how important can he really be? (That is a serious question since I have no idea who he is).

    Secondly, I am quite involved in the GOP here in my town and I have never seen support for a GOP candidate run so high. I honestly feel the media is trying to create controversies where none (or very little) exist. For every GOP person that says they are NOT going to vote for Bush, I can probably name you at least two registered democrats that say they are.....

    So even if it is true, it will probably balance out in the end.

    Edit: If you visit the ACU website, it seems to me as if they are pretty strongly behind the president.

    "Bush can count on the right"
    David Keene, ACU Chairman, in the Hill - May 18, 2004
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I think personally that he is doing a good job balancing the differences within the party. I'm not THAT far right but we do need party unity. Who would a dissatisfied Republican prefer? I actually enjoy hearing when he upsets a certain wing of the party. It shows that he is not a narrowed minded ideolog.
     
  4. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    Novak leans to the left? :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     
  5. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    Boy, I flubbed that one..... I just read what you posted and didn't look to see who wrote it. But in reading it, I think many would agree. I should change it to "left or far-right". The far-right does not represent the GOP even though the dems want to tie them to us all the time.....

    My bad!
     
  6. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    no problem, thanks for the laugh though. ;)
     
  7. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    My pleasure.....

    It was obvious that whoever wrote it is not a supporter of Bush. I can't stand the far-right of the GOP any more than I can stand the far-left. Shit, ole Buchey is an isolationist and we already know from history, his style of politics does not work.
     
  8. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    actually, novak is a firm conservative. Not far-right at all. last I heard of anyway.
     
  9. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    While many of us conservatives are worried about the growth of government, we are more concerned with the GWOT, and we are mostly pleased (from all the polling I've seen) with its progress. Yes, I disagree with Bush on several issues, but overall, I feel he is a good candidate, and I fully support his reelection.
     
  10. tim_duncan2000
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    tim_duncan2000 Active Member

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    I'm sure some might not agree with some of his policies, but I think they sure as hell are not going to vote for Kerry.
     

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