Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution and Parallels to Egypt 2011

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by GHook93, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. GHook93
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    GHook93 Aristotle

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    The Egypt Riots And The 1979 Iranian Revolution, A Note Of Warning And Encouragement | The New Republic

    (1) Like Murbarak the Shah ran his country in a relatively secular manner.
    (2) They used brutal, yet NECESSARY tactics, to suppress the radical and irrational elements of Islamofacists in this country.
    (3) They both rejected democracy
    (4) Unemployment, rising food prices fueled the revolt.
    (5) In Iran, just as what will happen in Egypt, it started out as a secular revoltion, that was hijacked by the Islamofacists.

    (6) Weak naive American Presidents that condemned a great allie while facilitating the Islamic Revolution/

    (7) The Islamofacists will hijack the movement by disguising themselves as pro-Democracy advocates. Once they get to power, they will stab the secularist, who started the revolution in the back and develop a government where the unelected Islamic Clerics and Supreme Leader rule over everything and have final say on everything.

    (8) Egypt, like Iran, will be worst off! The problems the secularist and young called for regime change will still be there, but now they will be under a more repressive Islamic Government that is antiwestern!

    (9) Egypt goes into confrontation with the USA!
     
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  2. georgephillip
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    georgephillip Gold Member Supporting Member

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  3. High_Gravity
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    High_Gravity Belligerent Drunk Supporting Member

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    Irans revolution did start out secular and than the Mullahs took it over, hope that doesn't happen in Egypt.
     
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  4. GHook93
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    GHook93 Aristotle

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  5. BlindBoo
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    BlindBoo Gold Member

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    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  6. BlindBoo
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    BlindBoo Gold Member

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    He did not hide his true intentions of setting up an Islamic state.

    History of Iran: Ayatollah Khomeini

    Once settled in Najaf, Ayatollah Khomeini began teaching fiqh at the Sheikh Mourteza Ansari madreseh. At this madreseh he delivered, between January 21 and February 8, 1970, his lectures on Velayat-e faqeeh, the theory of governance and Islamic Leadership (the text of these lectures was published in Najaf, not long after their delivery, under the title Velayat-e faqeeh ya Hukumat-i Islami). The text of the lectures on Velayat-e faqeeh was smuggled back to Iran by visitors who came to see the Khomeini in Najaf.

    The most visible sign of the popularity of Ayatollah Khomeini in the pre-revolutionary years, above all at the heart of the religious institution in Qom, came in June 1975 on the anniversary of the uprising of 15 Khordad. Students at the Feyziyeh madreseh began holding a demonstration within the confines of the building, and a sympathetic crowd assembled outside. Both gatherings continued for three days until they were attacked military forces, with numerous deaths resulting. Ayatollah Khomeini reacted with a message in which he declared the events in Qom and similar disturbances elsewhere to be a sign of hope that "freedom and liberation from the bonds of imperialism" were at hand. The beginning of the revolution came indeed some two and a half years later.

    In January 7, 1978 when an article appeared in the semi-official newspaper Ittila'at attacking him in such terms as a traitor working together with foreign enemies of the country. The next day a furious mass protest took place in Qom; it was suppressed by the security forces with heavy loss of life. This was the first in a series of popular confrontations that, gathering momentum throughout 1978, soon turned into a vast revolutionary movement, demanding the overthrow of the Pahlavi regime and the installation of an Islamic government.

    So there are fewer parrels betwenn Iran 1979 and Egypt 2011 than the New Republic reports. However the young protestors should still be wary of outside influences.
     
  7. GHook93
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    GHook93 Aristotle

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    No rather the religious leaders (actually group) has been formenting dissent from inside the country aka the Muslim Brotherhood!
     
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  8. georgephillip
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    georgephillip Gold Member Supporting Member

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    How is Egypt unlike Iran?

    First and foremost, Egypt is not primarily an oil state.

    It's revenue depends on tolls from the Suez Canal, tourism, manufactured and agricultural exports, and "strategic rents" which consist primarily of the $1.5 billion the US pays in bribes each year on behalf of Israel's Jewish "democracy."

    Since Egypt depends on the rest of the world for grain imports, what do you think would happen if its government suddenly adopted a radical and defiant ideology like Iran's?

    'Think all its major sources of income might suddenly disappear like the Peacock throne in '79?

    I'm just asking.

    RED RULES!
     
  9. Ropey
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    Ropey Honey Badger Don't Give A Shit! Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    You can't get through obsessive insanity Ghook.

    Obsession is an illness George
     
  10. georgephillip
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    georgephillip Gold Member Supporting Member

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    "A recent Pew poll found that 59% of Egyptians favor democracy in almost all situations. And fully 60 percent are very or somewhat worried about the specter of religious extremism in their society.

    "About 61% do not even think there is a struggle between modernizers and religion in Egypt.

    "Among the 31% who did see such a struggle, 59% favored religious forces and 21% favored the modernizers. Barry Rubin and Michael Totten misread this latter statistic to be true of all Egyptians.

    "They are wrong.

    "The statistic is not about Egyptians in general, but about the third of them who see a conflict between modernizers and religion.

    "59% of 31% is 18% of the whole Egyptian population who favor fundamentalists over modernizers.

    "The rest either favor the modernizers or think it is a phony conflict. Not thinking that modernism and religiosity conflict is generally a liberal point of view."

    Informed Comment: Why Egypt 2011 is Not Iran 1979
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011

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