Internet access is now a “right”?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by CaféAuLait, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. CaféAuLait
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    CaféAuLait This Space for Rent

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    Internet access is now a “right”?

    Feds Mull Rules, Fees to Spur Net Access

    Feds Mull Rules, Fees to Spur Net Access - WSJ.com

    Give me a freaking break!
     
  2. DiamondDave
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    DiamondDave Army Vet

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    See wasteful govt spending
     
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  3. ihopehefails
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    ihopehefails BANNED

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    No it is not a right but I suspect that once the government is paying for your internet they will control the access to it and what you see. Haven't you noticed that the drive to do this comes right after the first failed attempt to pass national health care. I suspect that the Obama administration doesn't like people talking openly on the internet and is now trying to "regulate" it by his standards.

    Can we say fairness doctrine?
     
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  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    The USA lags other developed nations in Broadband access. That is due to private industry not making the investment in the necessary infrastructure.
     
  5. Immanuel
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    Immanuel Gold Member

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    IHF,

    They won't be paying for yours or my internet access. They will be paying for access for the poor. We'll probably also be buying new computers for them as well.

    Just like with Safelink, I can see it now, we will now be taxed on our internet service, to provide internet services to the poor. I'm sure they will be giving us a reason for why we should do this.

    Immie
     
  6. Screaming Eagle
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    Screaming Eagle Active Member

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    Stop eating the shit the media feeds you. I am sure if you *honestly* compared America with every other nation on Earth that you would find more Americans have high speed internet access than the 'shits in holes we dug ourselves' people over in the liberal's utopian fantasy land somewhere in Europe or Crapistan.
     
  7. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    Do you get daily talking points e-mailed to you from the DNC, or do you make this bullshit up all by yourself?
     
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  8. Screaming Eagle
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    Screaming Eagle Active Member

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    No shit, we, one thirtieth of the world's population, have one third of the world's automobiles, and we are supposed to believe that while almost every single American has both computer and internet access we are somehow crap compared to some 'we live in a 100 sf apartment' culture in Southeast Asia where we still tell our children the kids over there are starving to death.
     
  9. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    while almost every single American has both computer and internet access

    that is the crap.
     
  10. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader

    The United States often views itself as a paragon of technology innovation and deployment. In some cases, that view is correct, but not when it comes to broadband deployment, where the country lags considerably behind other major nations. Here's why.

    By Richard Hoffman
    InformationWeek
    February 15, 2007 12:00 AM

    Broadband access in the United States continues to grow at an impressive rate, from 60 million users in March 2005 to 84 million in March 2006, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project. As-yet unpublished survey data gathered by Pew in December 2006 shows that 45% of respondents now report broadband access at home.

    Despite these compelling growth statistics, the reality isn't quite so rosy, especially when comparing broadband progress in the United States with other industrialized countries.

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    Path Intelligence installs sensors in high traffic areas. Those sensors detect cell phones and can use that data to examine traffic patterns and behavior, which can be viewed & analyzed in real time.
    According to a study by U.K.-based Point Topic, as of the third quarter in 2006, the United States led the world in total number of broadband lines installed with 54.5 million lines, followed by China with 48.6 million. The same Point Topic report, however, indicates that broadband growth rates are much higher in other countries -- for example, China is now projected to surpass the U.S. in total broadband lines within 2007, given current trends. And the total number of broadband lines, while a useful figure for some purposes, isn't the most meaningful statistic for measuring how common and widespread access really is, or to compare broadband progress relative to other nations.

    For these judgments, metrics based on per-capita household penetration provide a clearer picture. For instance, it's inevitable that, due to its vastly higher population, China will surpass the U.S. in total number of broadband lines, even if the percentage of people in China with broadband lines stays quite small and access is restricted largely to affluent urban areas.

    Looking at the more representative measurement of the percentage of those who have access to broadband connectivity, the United States isn't even in the top 10 countries, various studies indicate. President George W. Bush admitted back in 2004 that while broadband use had tripled over the previous four years, the U.S. then ranked 10th among industrialized nations for broadband availability, and he added, "Tenth is 10 spots too low, as far as I'm concerned." Now almost three years later, how much progress have we made, and where do we stand?

    more at link.
    When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader -- Internet Access -- InformationWeek
     

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