In Canada, if you get bad medical care, accept it, or they could just kill you...

Discussion in 'Canada' started by 2aguy, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. 2aguy
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    2aguy Diamond Member

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    Yep.... when the government controls your healthcare, they will treat you like the cog in the wheel you are... easily replaced or disposed of...

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blo..._with_patients_pressured_into_euthanasia.html

    Under socialized medicine, it doesn't take long to go from suicide as a "choice" to suicide as a pushed "product" to suicide as a murder for bureaucratic "convenience."

    Over in Canada, it's gotten to stage two.

    Roger Foley is a 42-year-old man with a terminal neural disease that makes it nearly impossible for him to move his arms or legs or even speak. Under Canada's zero-choice socialized medicine, he's gotten absolutely crappy care from a Canadian home care service, one of whose many violations has put him in the hospital for food poisoning, which is where he's at now.

    He states that when he complained about the bad service, he was told to go kill himself – politely, of course, since it's the Canadian way. He's saying "no," and now there's a lawsuit to force the Canadian socialized medical system to allow him some choice as to how he's going to manage his own care, given the failures of the bureaucrats who chose for him. Obviously inspired by the Charlie Gard dilemma in the U.K., the bureaucrats are fighting back, determined to ensure he gets the substandard quality of medical care he's already gotten, with the only "out" in suicide.

    A great deal for them, you see.

    Here is how one expert described the problem, according to CTV a few months ago:

    According to Trudo Lemmens, a professor and Scholl Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Law, Foley's allegations – if true – are "very troubling."

    "If true, we would have here an instance of a patient receiving an offer for MAID (medical assistance in dying) while the patient precisely complains about receiving substandard levels of care," Lemmens said in an email to CTV News. "MAID should not be introduced as an option to someone who complains about sub-standard care and clearly not to someone who is suicidal."
     
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