If the South had Won ...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Toro, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Toro
    Offline

    Toro Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Messages:
    50,797
    Thanks Received:
    11,059
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    The Big Bend via Riderville
    Ratings:
    +25,130
    ... the Civil War, what do you think would have happened?

    Would there be two countries today? Would there have been a reunion later? How do you think the history of the United States would have evolved?
     
  2. Luissa
    Offline

    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    43,190
    Thanks Received:
    5,593
    Trophy Points:
    1,785
    Location:
    TARDIS
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    that they would have been screwed for awhile but probably recovered. They grew the cotton but didn't have any way to process it. SOme of the slaves would have left but I don't think many because they would have had to start paying them better to stick around.
    I also think the north would have gone after them again and the fighting would have continued for years.
     
  3. Kevin_Kennedy
    Offline

    Kevin_Kennedy Defend Liberty

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2008
    Messages:
    17,592
    Thanks Received:
    1,582
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Location:
    Ohio
    Ratings:
    +2,028
    It's difficult to say. They could possibly have come to the conclusion that being a part of the Union was better than independence and tried to rejoin, perhaps the remaining U.S. states would have decided to join the Confederacy, or perhaps they would have come together again and formed something entirely new.

    I personally think the two would likely have remained separate, because there is obviously a disconnect between northern and southern political philosophy. However, I think the two would be allies and trade partners now.
     
  4. Midnight Marauder
    Offline

    Midnight Marauder BANNED

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    12,404
    Thanks Received:
    1,876
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +1,876
    What?

    The Cotton Gin was used primarily in the South. The processed, baled cotton was then sold to textile mills in Europe and the North, for weaving into cloth.

    After you gin the cotton and make the bales, the "processing" is over, that's the final product you sell.

    As to what the world would be like today had the South won? There is really no way to speculate about that. The North's illegal invasion sort of made the point moot. I have little doubt however, that the North would have continued a naval blockade, and continued invasions.
     
  5. Luissa
    Offline

    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    43,190
    Thanks Received:
    5,593
    Trophy Points:
    1,785
    Location:
    TARDIS
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    the way the system was set up then, neither one could have survived without the other.
    Not saying they couldn't have developed the industries to be able to survive but it would have taken years and they would have realized probably quickly that they needed each other.
     
  6. Luissa
    Offline

    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    43,190
    Thanks Received:
    5,593
    Trophy Points:
    1,785
    Location:
    TARDIS
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    sorry I wasn't clear, you pretty much said what I meant.
    They had to weave into cloth in order to sale it and most of the cotton goods being shipped out of the US were being shipped out of the north who was controlling the prices.
     
  7. Midnight Marauder
    Offline

    Midnight Marauder BANNED

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    12,404
    Thanks Received:
    1,876
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +1,876
    No,

    They had to harvest, clean and BALE it to sell it TO the textile manufacturers. And Europe was by far the biggest market. The cotton gin revolutionized cotton production.

    You are confusing textile processing with cotton processing. Those are two entirely different things.

    It's the same as comparing wheat production to making flour or bread.

    See?
     
  8. Luissa
    Offline

    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    43,190
    Thanks Received:
    5,593
    Trophy Points:
    1,785
    Location:
    TARDIS
    Ratings:
    +5,664
    but the north was making it impossible for them to trade with Europe and what is good is wheat if are not making it into bread. Do you sit around and eat wheat with your dinner?
     
  9. Toro
    Offline

    Toro Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Messages:
    50,797
    Thanks Received:
    11,059
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    The Big Bend via Riderville
    Ratings:
    +25,130
    It is almost certain then that the United States would be a diminished global power. Correct?
     
  10. Midnight Marauder
    Offline

    Midnight Marauder BANNED

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    12,404
    Thanks Received:
    1,876
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +1,876
    Wheat, and cotton, and tobacco are raw commodities. They are sold as such. Neither requires any additional processing to be sold to those who would use this RAW MATERIAL to make other things, which they then sell. So your statement earlier that the south could not process the cotton is completely invalid. They did process it. But they didn't make sheets, gowns or blankets out of it.

    Just man up, say "yeah, you're right" or my personal favorite, "I stand corrected" and move on.

    Now,

    The Union blockade, had it continued, would not have been tolerated by the British or the French. Tobacco and cotton were in great demand by those two world powers, and had the war gone on much longer they were ready to commit navel forces to stop the blockade. The French had already donated some fast, "blockade buster" ships to the south, trying to keep the trade routes going.

    However, the Anaconda Plan was by far the most effective maneuver of the war, probably shortened it drastically.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009

Share This Page