Idiot editorial

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by DKSuddeth, Mar 28, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    First off, my apologies for posting the whole article. It comes from a news site that requires registering and in order to avoid that issue I just posted the whole thing. My personal opinion is that this moron doesn't have the first clue about whats going on and how to deal with it, but thats just me.


    Outsourcing of Confidence

    If foreign competition scares us, we are in trouble


    By RUBEN NAVARRETTE / The Dallas Morning News


    The myth endures that the outsourcing of American jobs is tantamount to treason. But what's really unpatriotic is the movement to stop it.

    You see it everywhere. You've got John Kerry calling corporate executives who ship jobs overseas "Benedict Arnolds" in a bid to get organized labor excited about his candidacy. You've got CNN's Lou Dobbs bemoaning the "Exporting of America" by listing the names of American companies that send jobs offshore, thus branding them with the 21st century's version of the Scarlet Letter – a big "O" for outsourcer.

    But as I travel the country, I've decided that what makes me angriest about this debate is that it offends my sensibilities as an American. The line advanced by the panderers and the protectionists goes against everything I ever was taught and believe about how Americans never run from a fight, never duck the competition, never cower in fear and never, ever, surrender.

    Understand this much. That's the extent of what the protectionists are peddling – surrender. By campaigning so vigorously, and so loudly, to try to prevent companies from sending jobs abroad in a changing economy, they're advertising the fact that they have absolutely no confidence in the ability of Americans to adapt to those changes. Instead of pumping up their countrymen and telling us that we can and will succeed on the global stage, they'd rather convince Americans that we don't have a prayer of competing and shouldn't even bother trying. The way the protectionists see the world, Americans always are going to be undercut by low-wage workers in the Third World, and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it.

    How depressing. And how tragic that the line is catching on. Case in point: A college student tells an interviewer for the Lou Dobbs program that he has decided to give up his pursuit of a career as a computer programmer because he is afraid the job he is going after is headed to India, where someone will do it for a fraction of the salary he believes he deserves. Rather than lower his asking price, acquire more schooling or take on a new set of computer skills that might allow him to compete – head to head – with Indian workers, the young man has opted to throw in the towel and abandon his dream of becoming a programmer. Instead, he has decided to become – gasp! – a lawyer.

    Let's think about our young friend. Here he is changing careers at about the age that one is able to buy a drink in a bar. He could have been a bit more honest and acknowledged that at least part of his reluctance in competing with people from countries such as India or China isn't just that they work for less. It could be that they work harder. Or study more. In the marketplace, they come to play, and they take no prisoners. Who could blame the young man for not wanting to compete for jobs with people like that? But he prefers to couch the argument in terms of foreign competitors being willing to work for less than Americans demand.

    Say, this kid might make a good lawyer after all.

    On a recent trip to New Delhi, Secretary of State Colin Powell offered reassurances that the Bush administration wouldn't try to halt the outsourcing of high-tech jobs to India.

    Great. But what the administration needs to do next is to begin a national campaign, perhaps run through the Labor Department, to convince Americans they have nothing to be afraid of and that they can compete with Indians or anyone else if they only will tap into the things that Americans have and always have had in abundance: Ingenuity. Confidence. Fearlessness. Optimism. The belief that any product can be improved upon and that the next great idea is just around the corner.

    Americans used to have all of that in their personal arsenals. If they no longer do, then, well, the fact that jobs are going overseas is the least of our worries.
     
  2. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Protectionism is suicide. I know it seems neat in the short term, but it's not a good idea.
     
  3. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    Just so that you understand, I'm slowly beginning to see the bad side to being protectionist. I do, however, have issue with some people like the writer of this editorial who can't do anything but accuse people of fear or ignorance when he has zero clue as to how best to help people along with joining the 'global economy' except to tell people with doctorates and/or a dozen certifications to 'improve' their education.
     
  4. NewGuy
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    The author IS an idiot, the computer industry in America, like most are beginning to find, leaves a person hanging in the wind having to re-educate every few years at an expense that will never be compensated for because the education is too expensive. Foreign markets don't get that treatment. Before anyone dares argue that point, I am in the industry, have been offered a job in India, watched and currently work with people from india in programming jobs, and face being eliminated in my job because people from india will take a lower wage.

    I know what the industry is doing. I have been in computers for more than 10 years, been in other blue collar trades, owned businesses and try to keep ahead of inflation by changing occupations if necessary when the pay falls comparative to inflation.

    The result is that Cheap labor comes over not knowing how to deal with our cost of living. They agree to work for dirt cheap in our economy that we cannot afford to live in. They are used to living in poverty. We are used to wealth by comparison.

    The difference is that their poverty affords them the luxury of ownership. Our wealth demands leasing our lives and increasing debt. -This is by peer pressure and lack of knowledge. We live in luxury and lease our cars, houses, movies, and all else. If we loose our jobs, we are robbed of everything.

    When a foreigner comes over to INCREASE their lifestyle, they live like kings until trapped by some of the same conditions WE fall into. -Mortgages, vehicle leases, working salary instead of hourly, etc. After that, they gripe like us.

    The issue is that our debt mentality and economy is being hidden by letting these jobs go to foreign labor, and then we immigrate cheap labor illegaly to pick lettuce to offset the costs. -Then all Americans say that illegal immigration is then necessary.

    In reality, protectionism IS NOT FLAWED. It is our economy and our fiat money that has led to debt mentality that is the problem. This is compounded by our desire to ignore the law in favor of "the ends justifies the means" mentality and then complain that the outcome is inevitable.
     

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