Iceland: Polution-free, renewable, clean energy... oil-free in less than 50 years

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by jAZ, Jan 23, 2006.

  1. jAZ
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    jAZ Member

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    How the heck is Iceland able to do this and we can't?

    http://www.fuelcellsworks.com/Supppage4338.html

    Publication Date:18-January-2006
    09:00 PM US Eastern Timezone
    Source:ABC News

    REYKJAVIK, Iceland— Iceland has energy to spare, and the small country has found a cutting-edge way to reduce its oil dependency. Volcanoes formed the island nation out of ash and lava, and molten rock heats huge underground lakes to the boiling point.

    The hot water — energy sizzling beneath the surface — is piped into cities and stored in giant tanks, providing heat for homes, businesses and even swimming pools.

    The volcanoes melted ice, which formed rivers. The water runs through turbines, providing virtually all the country's electricity.

    Iceland wants to make a full conversion and plans to modify its cars, buses and trucks to run on renewable energy — with no dependence on oil.

    Water Turned Into Fuel

    Iceland has already started by turning water into fuel — hydrogen fuel.

    Here's how it works: Electrodes split the water into hydrogen and oxygen molecules. Hydrogen electrons pass through a conductor that creates the current to power an electric engine.

    Hydrogen fuel now costs two to three times as much as gasoline, but gets up to three times the mileage of gas, making the overall cost about the same.

    As an added benefit, there are no carbon emissions — only water vapor.

    In the capital, Reykjavik, they are already testing three hydrogen-powered electric buses. The drivers are impressed.

    "I like these buses better because with hydrogen you get no pollution," said bus driver Rognvaldur Jonatanlson.

    By the middle of this century, all Icelanders will be required to run their cars only on hydrogen fuel, meaning no more gasoline.

    "If we make hydrogen and use that as a fuel for transportation then we can run the whole society on our own local renewable energy sources," said Marie Maack of the Hydrogen Research Project.

    Icelanders say they're committed to showing the world that by making fuel from water, it is possible to kick the oil habit.
     
  2. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    I'm all for it. Let's get more hydrogen fuel-cell cars in America.
     
  3. jAZ
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    jAZ Member

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    Can you call up your party and your president and get them to pay attention to someone other than their oil lobbists? If more people in the GOP pressed for this (and balked at all the effort we are putting into securing oil resources), the world would be a very different and better place.
     
  4. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    I'm all for hydrogen/alternative fuel vehicels too. Especially for beater cars, buses and trucks ect. But they better not ever make gasoline outlawed. I need for the power! Hydrogen engines suck powerwise.
     
  5. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Are you going to be saying this tomorrow night when he advocates building up the nuclear power industry to alleviate the demand for oil?

    BTW Iceland is unique in that it is a small island that has alot of Geothermal heat and natural gas sources.
     
  6. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    We can do it too, they have been working on this for years.
    Nice they did the leg work for us. :halo:
     
  7. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Good for Iceland, I am all for additional sources of energy that do not include Middle East oil. I saw a program on the History Channel to showed Brazil in now about 40% ethanol consumption for the automobile fuel needs. The farmers of America would be great at providing grain our fuel needs.

    I wonder what the GNP output of Iceland compared to USA is? And how many cross country commerce miles are driven in Iceland as compared to USA?
     
  8. jAZ
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    jAZ Member

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    Nuclear <> Hydrogen.

    Nuclear isn't the long-term solution we need. It's comes with TONS of pollution and TONS of risk.
     
  9. jAZ
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    jAZ Member

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    biodiesel.
     
  10. manu1959
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    manu1959 Left Coast Isolationist

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    seems a reasonable comparison

    size: iceland is slightly smaller than kentucky

    Population: 296,737

    Natural resources: fish, hydropower, geothermal power, diatomite

    Environment-current issues: water pollution from fertilizer runoff; inadequate wastewater treatment

    Religions: Lutheran Church of Iceland 85.5%, Reykjavik Free Church 2.1%, Roman Catholic Church 2%, Hafnarfjorour Free Church 1.5%, other Christian 2.7%, other or unspecified 3.8%, unaffiliated 2.4% (2004)

    Political pressure groups and leaders:
    NA

    Economy - overview:
    Iceland's Scandinavian-type economy is basically capitalistic, yet with an extensive welfare system (including generous housing subsidies), low unemployment, and remarkably even distribution of income. In the absence of other natural resources (except for abundant geothermal power), the economy depends heavily on the fishing industry, which provides 70% of export earnings and employs 8% of the work force. The economy remains sensitive to declining fish stocks as well as to fluctuations in world prices for its main exports: fish and fish products, aluminum, and ferrosilicon. Government policies include reducing the budget and current account deficits, limiting foreign borrowing, containing inflation, revising agricultural and fishing policies, diversifying the economy, and privatizing state-owned industries. The government remains opposed to EU membership, primarily because of Icelanders' concern about losing control over their fishing resources. Iceland's economy has been diversifying into manufacturing and service industries in the last decade, and new developments in software production, biotechnology, and financial services are taking place. The tourism sector is also expanding, with the recent trends in ecotourism and whale watching. Growth had been remarkably steady in 1996-2001 at 3%-5%, but could not be sustained in 2002 in an environment of global recession. Growth resumed in 2003, and estimates call for strong growth until 2007, slowly dropping until the end of the decade.


    http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ic.html
     
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