huh ? 78 MPG ??

Discussion in 'Energy' started by HomeInspect, May 8, 2012.

  1. HomeInspect
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    HomeInspect Senior Member

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    HUH ?? THIS SHOULD TICK YOU OFF

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBnlXGvA1Wk&feature=youtube_gdata_player]VW Passat 78.5 MPG (Imperial gallon) 65.2 MPG US gallon in the Uk - YouTube[/ame]
     
  2. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    Intewesting. Vewwy intewesting.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    It does.
     
  4. Douger
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    Douger BANNED

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    I have a 1973 Toyota land cruiser that gets about 30 mpg(diesel) Your masters never let it be imported to the M_pyre. You got the P.O.S. made for murkins. 6 cyl gas that got/gets about 12 mpg.
    BTW. The war isn't about oil.
    Good night, and remember....Gawd Blast murka.
     
  5. FireFly
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    FireFly Bright F**ker

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    It's just another EPA regulation designed to generate more revenue for the US Government.
     
  6. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    Did he say where in Europe he rented it? 1.6 litre that's probably a 3 cylinder.
    You could buy one and have it shipped back, but depending on what state you're in it would have to pass inspections. Oh and the steering wheel should be on the left. Unless you're a mailman. Mail person.
     
  7. RGR
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    RGR VIP Member

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    About 3000 miles into a road trip, getting a solid 42 mpg on a 2011 Ford Fiesta, 5 speed stick. Worst tank of 39mpg, best tank of 47. Don't need no stink-in diesel.
     
  8. Star
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    Damn Republicans ----


    Over half of all federal gas taxes are due to gas tax increases by Reagan and Bush. The next biggest federal gas tax increaser was Eisenhower.


    Gas taxes make sense to Republicans because they target middle and low income people.
     
  9. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    You gotta watch where you buy gasoline. The local Huck's store is shit gas. 3-5 mpg less/gallon I swear.
    i go down the street and buy from Mach 1 (a BP station). good gasoline.

    Years ago I interviewed with a gasoline jobber (wholesaler). The gal showed me some charts and stats and formulas. I'm like- what's this, looks like an inert compound. I was told they blend it with their gas. I said oh that's a "filler" or "extender". She said "uh yeah".
    i didn't get the job.


    You see the truth of things in life and you don't get the job. But don't worry about that. Be right and know that you're right. That's worth more than money. It's called wealth. Wealth may not buy you a BMW but it will buy you a plate of beans and a black and white TV with Reynolds Wrap for an antenna.

    I miss being poor. I was healthier and had less problems. But poverty doesn't scare me at all. I almost welcome it. Been there more times than I can recall. That's where the good memories are. When you have nothing to fall back on but yourself. And if you're lucky enough to have a squeeze partner or even a kid well that's icing on the cake. Money breeds complacency. Complacency breeds laxity. Laxity breeds sloth. Sloth breeds... baby sloth. And they're damn cute critters. Save the sloth.
     
  10. Star
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    I can understand why you don't want to address federal gas taxes ---

    Currently the federal gas tax stands at 18.4¢/gal, if I'm doing my arithmetic correctly (?) all but 1.4¢/gal of that federal gas tax was signed into law by Republican presidents. But check it out, while whining about a measly little 3% increase in federal income taxes on people that get paid 100 times (much more upstream) more than the average American, the Republicans are crying for an increase on gas taxes 10 - 20 times higher ----- 98% - 99% of which would be on lower and middle income earners.







    By Charles Krauthammer


    Friday, June 6, 2008
    So now we know: The price point is $4.
    At $3 a gallon, Americans just grin and bear it, suck it up and, while complaining profusely, keep driving like crazy. At $4, it is a world transformed. Americans become rational creatures. Mass transit ridership is at a 50-year high. Driving is down 4 percent. (Any U.S. decline is something close to a miracle.) Hybrids and compacts are flying off the lots. SUV sales are in free fall.

    The wholesale flight from gas guzzlers is stunning in its swiftness, but utterly predictable. Everything has a price point. Remember that "love affair" with SUVs? Love, it seems, has its price too.

    America's sudden change in car-buying habits makes suitable mockery of that absurd debate Congress put on last December on fuel efficiency standards. At stake was precisely what miles-per-gallon average would every car company's fleet have to meet by precisely what date.
    It was one out-of-a-hat number (35 mpg) compounded by another (by 2020). It involved, as always, dozens of regulations, loopholes and throws at a dartboard. And we already knew from past history what the fleet average number does. When oil is cheap and everybody wants a gas guzzler, fuel efficiency standards force manufacturers to make cars that nobody wants to buy. When gas prices go through the roof, this agent of inefficiency becomes an utter redundancy.

    At $4 a gallon, the fleet composition is changing spontaneously and overnight, not over the 13 years mandated by Congress. (Even Stalin had the modesty to restrict himself to five-year plans.) Just Tuesday, GM announced that it would shutter four SUV and truck plants, add a third shift to its compact and midsize sedan plants in Ohio and Michigan, and green-light for 2010 the Chevy Volt, an electric hybrid.

    Some things, like renal physiology, are difficult. Some things, like Arab-Israeli peace, are impossible. And some things are preternaturally simple. You want more fuel-efficient cars? Don't regulate. Don't mandate. Don't scold. Don't appeal to the better angels of our nature. Do one thing: Hike the cost of gas until you find the price point.

    Unfortunately, instead of hiking the price ourselves by means of a gasoline tax that could be instantly refunded to the American people in the form of lower payroll taxes, we let the Saudis, Venezuelans, Russians and Iranians do the taxing for us -- and pocket the money that the tax would have recycled back to the American worker.

    This is insanity. For 25 years and with utter futility (starting with "The Oil-Bust Panic," the New Republic, February 1983), I have been advocating the cure: a U.S. energy tax as a way to curtail consumption and keep the money at home. On this page in May 2004 (and again in November 2005), I called for "the government -- through a tax -- to establish a new floor for gasoline," by fully taxing any drop in price below a certain benchmark. The point was to suppress demand and to keep the savings (from any subsequent world price drop) at home in the U.S. Treasury rather than going abroad. At the time, oil was $41 a barrel. It is now $123.

    [SIZE=+0]But instead of doing the obvious -- tax the damn thing -- we go through spasms of destructive alternatives, such as efficiency standards, ethanol mandates and now a crazy carbon cap-and-trade system the Senate is debating this week. These are infinitely complex mandates for inefficiency and invitations to corruption. But they have a singular virtue: They hide the cost to the American consumer. [/SIZE]

    Want to wean us off oil? Be open and honest. The British are paying $8 a gallon for petrol. Goldman Sachs is predicting we will be paying $6 by next year. Why have the extra $2 (above the current $4) go abroad? Have it go to the U.S. Treasury as a gasoline tax and be recycled back into lower payroll taxes.

    Announce a schedule of gas tax hikes of 50 cents every six months for the next two years. And put a tax floor under $4 gasoline, so that as high gas prices transform the U.S. auto fleet, change driving habits and thus hugely reduce U.S. demand -- and bring down world crude oil prices -- the American consumer and the American economy reap all of the benefit.

    Herewith concludes my annual exercise in futility. By the time I write next year's edition, you'll be paying for gas in bullion.
     

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