How's everyones hunt going?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by tinydancer, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    41,543
    Thanks Received:
    9,377
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +21,094
    Up here it's awesome because everyone seems to be nailing their quota.

    But it's the one that gets away that always kill me. Last night my husband was running our dogs, Bad Ass and Dusty Roads he ran into a buck that was soooooooooooo stupid in the rut. He was snorting so loud it sounded like the sound effects of American Werewolf in London at the end of the movie.

    My husband heard him first and then the buck ran into the light on the highway about a hundred yards away and he was Bambi's freaking dad.

    12 point, large sweep, about 350 lbs. Snorting and gunning my husband down.

    He was oblivious to anything chasing the ladies down.:eusa_angel:

    Best wishes to all of you hunters.

    Yours,

    td
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2010
  2. Revere
    Offline

    Revere BANNED

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Messages:
    7,427
    Thanks Received:
    415
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Watching you in my profile page
    Ratings:
    +415
    I'd do anything for a venison tenderloin.
     
  3. jimbetty123
    Offline

    jimbetty123 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    78
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +3
    Some areas of work for the hunting retriever require simple familiarity with the conditions. This type of training is designed to prepare your dog in advance for things that are awkward, confusing, or difficult upon the first exposure. Blinds, boats and decoys all fall into this category. If you hunt your dog in a variety of situations it is a good idea to practice all of them so that your initial hunts will be easier for her.

    Teach your dog to sit and stay, briefly, outside of the blind after she has delivered her bird, then give the release command, "Hie-on" or whatever, and she will shake off the excess mud and water outside rather than all over you and your equipment.

    In the case of hunting from a boat, you will have to put up with some water shaken off in the boat, but you can minimize it by having your dog sit and stay in the far end of the boat while you return to the other end, then give the "Shake" command. Soon your dog will learn to stand up and shake while away from you. Remember, "Sit," or "Sit; Stay" must mean don’t shake, don’t move, until you give a release command. Most dogs, if hunted enough, will get into the habit of doing this dependably without further training.
     

Share This Page