Homebrewing system

Discussion in 'Food & Wine' started by CWayne, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. CWayne
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    CWayne Senior Member

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    How many homebrewers do we have here?

    I do the standby starter system found all around America. A boil kettle, a keg style cooler for strike water, and a chest type cooler as a mash tun, and a fermenting vessel [usually a glass carboy].

    I ran across a system the other day that is essentially a 'brew in bag' system but they call it a 'brew in A Conical" system. It is a four-in-one system that really seems to save space.

    The price for the full system doesn't seem too outlandish and if one can make reproducible batches that can then be scaled up, a possible turnkey business can be had.

    Any thoughts on the effectiveness of this system?

    Here is a link to the webpage that details the costs based upon the size of the system.

    The full system with all the bells and whistles is ~6200 dollars.

    Homebrewery BIAC Complete Beer Brewing System

    Here is a video on the full process using this system.

     
  2. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    I have been a homebrewer for over 15 years. I don't really remember exactly when I started, I do remember my kids were little and they are now 25 and 29. So it might be closer to 20 years.
    Anyhow... I brewed the conventional AG method for many years, and then about 3-4 years ago I switched to the BIAB variant where you bring the water to strike temp, put the bag in...pour in grains and mash in the brewpot. Then you squeeze and sparge over the suspended bag until satisfied you got the goodness out. I increased my efficiency 7-8% over standard AG.

    To comment on this system, it has been discussed several times at homebrewtalk among others. Seems a solid system that can indeed be scaled up if one wanted to move into the microbrewery business.
     
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    Last edited: Nov 30, 2019 at 10:01 AM
  3. CWayne
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    CWayne Senior Member

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    Until I ran across this BIAC, I was considering building a HERMS. The cost would probably be less, but the entire methods seem overly complicated with the hose systems they put in place. It would be best if you could clean once, set it up, and then switch the process around electronically. The moving of hoses can lead to a missed closed valve and you then lose a lot of product and risk burns if you don't get it closed soon enough.
     
  4. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    HERMS was not for me. I brew for pleasure, it is not a science fair project for me. I don't want to make the process like a laboratory.
    Having said that, if I ever go electric the BREWHA is a strong contender.
    I am for simplifying. Unfortunately I have RA, so the main reason I went the modified BIAB method was using a pulley system to suspend the heavy laden grains so I don't have to lift stuff as much. As my condition worsens over the years I will probably end up going electric to eliminate lifting completely.
     
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  5. CWayne
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    CWayne Senior Member

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    Well, I'm more interested in being able to repeat a batch on a consistent basis. I have the Beersmith 3 and downloaded the profiles for all the brewha biac systems to see what would be required to upscale. I still hold (fading at the moment) a dream of opening my own taproom and running a micro or nano-brewery in the back.
     
  6. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    I think every homebrewer toys with the idea from time to time. I did, and sometimes still do.
    Honestly I would have already if we had a free market system that didn't impose $10,000 license requirements, and that is just to start. Plenty of other regulations to pay after that. Our property has an old beauty salon on it, still in good shape. That is where I brew. To pass the inspections etc.... prolly $25,000 minimum.
     
  7. CWayne
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    CWayne Senior Member

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    Yeah, 10k is just the Feds. State regs impose at least another 5k per year.
     

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