Hmmmm it's supposedly hotter but the sea level dropped 10mm

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    So what gives? The temps are "going up" so that means sea level must rise...it's inevitable, but lo and behold it is dropping.
     

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  2. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    Did you see the latest catastrope paper that says even a 2 degree increase will put us over the tipping point?
    "The results show temperatures appear to have been more than 5 ˚C warmer in polar regions while the tropics only warmed marginally; strikingly similar to recent trends. Not only this, but taken together, the world appears to have been some 1.9 ˚C warmer when compared to preindustrial temperatures. Critically, the warmer temperatures appear to have resulted in global sea levels some 6.6 to 9.4 metres higher than today, with a rate of rise of between 60 to 90 centimetres per decade — more than double that recently observed."

    Hahaha. More than double recently seen! More like more than 10x recently seen. How does crap like that make it through peer review? I guess horror stories are as popular as horror movies when it comes to Global Climate Disruption.
     
  3. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    As I said earlier the current climatological peer review process is a huge circle jerk. It is a very small coterie that controls what is published. That makes it false. The peer review process is broken and in their case needs to be abolished.
     
  4. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. Mini 14
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    Mini 14 Senior Member

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    The seawater is evaporating.

    Ice doesn't evaporate.

    Sheesh!!!

    :)
     
  6. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    Ice will sublimate.
     
  7. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    :lol::lol::lol: Going to come up with anything more current there Chris :lol::lol::lol:

    10 year old graphs are about as useful as used toilet paper!
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Now what do real scientists say on this subject?

    A new view on sea level rise : article : Nature Reports Climate Change

    Over the course of the twentieth century, the rate of sea level rise has roughly tripled in response to 0.8 °C global warming2. Since the beginning of satellite measurements, sea level has risen about 80 per cent faster, at 3.4 millimetres per year3, than the average IPCC model projection of 1.9 millimetres per year. The difference between the semi-empirical estimates and the model-based estimates of the IPCC can be attributed largely to the response of continental ice to greenhouse warming. The IPCC range assumes a near-zero net contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to future sea level rise, on the basis that Antarctica is expected to gain mass from an increase in snowfall. Observations show, however, that both ice sheets have been losing mass at an accelerating rate over the past two decades4.

    A number of recent studies taking the semi-empirical approach have predicted much higher sea level rise for the twenty-first century than the IPCC, exceeding one metre if greenhouse gas emissions continue to escalate (Fig. 1). These new results have found wide recognition in the scientific community, as recent broad-based assessments show5, 6, 7. The question is: how plausible are the new estimates?
     
  9. Charles_Main
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    Charles_Main AR15 Owner

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    All I know is my favorite beach in Florida was about 100 feet bigger then it used to be the last time I was there. Either they trucked in a shit load of sand, or the ocean level was lower :)
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    The Secret of Sea Level Rise: It Will Vary Greatly By Region by Michael D. Lemonick: Yale Environment 360

    For at least two decades now, climate scientists have been telling us that CO2 and other human-generated greenhouse gases are warming the planet, and that if we keep burning fossil fuels the trend will continue. Recent projections suggest a global average warming of perhaps 3 to 4 degrees C, or 5.4 to 7 degrees F, by the end of this century.

    But those same scientists have also been reminding us consistently that this is just an average. Thanks to all sorts of regional factors — changes in vegetation, for example, or ice cover, or prevailing winds — some areas are likely to warm more than that, while others should warm less.

    What’s true for temperature, it turns out, is also true for another frequently invoked consequence of global warming. Sea level, according to the best current projections, could rise by about a meter by 2100, in large part due to melting of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets. But that figure, too, is just a global average. In some places — Scotland, Iceland, and Alaska for example — it could be significantly less in the centuries to come. In others, like much of the eastern United States, it could be significantly more.

    And among the most powerful influences on regional sea level is a surprising force: the massive polar ice sheets and their gravitational pull, which will lessen as the ice caps melt and shrink, with profoundly different effects on sea level in various parts of the globe.
     

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