Higher Education

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by RobertOne, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. RobertOne
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    RobertOne Guest

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    I noticed that this was being addressed on an unrelated thread, and I think it’s an important topic to discuss. There are people here from various regions of the world whose governments address higher education in different ways.

    How do you feel about the state of higher education? Do you feel it is accessible to all income groups? Does the government provide enough aid? Should the government provide full tuition? What do you think of state run Universities? What about private colleges? What are your thoughts as to the differences between private and public universities? What about tests such as the SAT (or equivalent in other countries). Are the tests an appropriate measure and good to use?

    I believe that higher education is fairly accessible to most Americans. There are exceptions. No system is perfect, but if you are willing to work hard I believe that college is an option to everyone. There is a significant divide between public and private institutions of learning (not just cost), and I don't think this is a bad thing. Public Universities are not bad by any means, but it is a different setting, and that setting is good for some. I chose to attend a private college because I wanted a smaller school's environment. I wanted to know most of the students on campus, and I wanted the professor accessibility. I know that in every class that I have taken, the first thing the professor does is give their home phone number to the class. They regularly invite students to their homes for dinner or just discussions. Generally speaking, private colleges also have much higher quality resources and facilities. The downfall is, almost everyone I know will have over 200k in deferred debt when they leave graduate school.

    Your education basically defines your future. This is an important issue and is always one of the main issues in elections. I'm sure I missed some of the big questions, so just post your opinion and address the issues that you think are the most important.
     
  2. winston churchi
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    winston churchi Member

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    I suppose in todays world it is certainly a plus. However I must state that I have worked with many graduates of universities and many of them find themselves in low paying jobs at an entry level and unable to pay their debts without having to hold two or three jobs.

    A friend of mine decided against attending a university and favoured working as a temp. He went from temp job to temp for about two years. From these temp jobs came a permanent job in which he now earns over eight thousand dollars a year. He works in Washington DC and has almost no college education at all. This has upset his wifes family. She attended one of the most prestigious universities in the country - she comes from Boston. I do not know if she holds a bachlors or masters to be honest but it does not matter at any rate. She has moved from job to job all over the DC area and in fact she was working at the Pentegon when 911 occured - she was out of the office that day (but the plane did not hit her area). She earns in the lows 50' s a year. What upsets her family, parents that is, is that her husband earns quite a bit more than she does basically in the same field.

    Another friend of mine had attended a college first followed by a university to become a teacher. It is now several years later and she can still only find a part time teaching job and working full time as a server in a resturant. She still whines to me today of her outstanding debt she cannot seem to rid of.

    Another friend attended a university for six years and graduated with honors. Her goal was to work in a department store as a buyer (I did not feel a college education was required for this but I was told I was wrong). She never did find that job and instead opened her own catering business. Her knowledge came from her years working in the food and beverage industry that supported her while in school.
     
  3. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I think its pretty accessible too although I think i would change a few things. I think we should have some standards people have to maintain to get money from the government. Like with scholarships. I know i recieved federal grants, but there was no requirement for getting it next year other than being in financial need. If we are going to give people money for college we should have some standards in place so that we know the money will be spent well.
     
  4. RobertOne
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    RobertOne Guest

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    Winston:

    I certainly agree with you that education is not the only factor, but it is an important one. Your ability to sell yourself, experiences, job experience, all play a big factor. I personally feel that the college experience is an important thing in itself. I wouldn't give up my time in college for anything. There is more to it than just the classes. You build contacts and social networks, experience so many things, and learn a lot.

    It also depends on your field.
     
  5. Moi
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    Moi Active Member

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    I think education is accessible. I think it's great that state's support them and this way, every income level benefits from their patronage. I also think that government has no business giving people money for education unless it's given to everyone, regardless of income.

    It is true that today's graduates are not completely employable without experience and that a degree alone isn't the panacea. Yet, of course, one is necessary on so many levels. College is not just about book learning or excelling at specific tasks (like a technical school might teach). It's about a process; a process of being responsible for sinking or swimming. About learning to follow your calling. And, about learning to learn and absorb.

    Truthfully, the best workers I've been exposed to are those who've worked their way through school! They have experience in both worlds.
     

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