Help! Questions about Medicare & Elder care

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Richard-H, Aug 1, 2009.

  1. Richard-H
    Offline

    Richard-H Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Messages:
    2,285
    Thanks Received:
    385
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Ratings:
    +510
    I would greatly appreciate it if anyone that had experience and/or knowledge about elder care and medicare would reply with any helpful information or links to relavant URLs:

    My elderly father has recently been diagnosed with Alzeimer diease. It is apparent that he will soon need assisted living.

    According to a family member (who has the power of attorney):

    Assisted living facilities in Florida have an initial fee of $200k just for entry, and $3k/month thereafter.

    My father will not qualify for medicare if he has any assets whatsoever, except for a single home and car.

    10 years after my father passes away, medicare will confiscate all of his former property and collect any outstanding debt from his heirs unless his estate and will are correctly arranged by a attorney specializing in elder care law.

    There are only 400 such attorneys in the country. The fee for the service of the attorney under consideration is $16k.

    I find the above rather hard to believe.

    Does any one know if any or all of the above is true?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Emma
    Offline

    Emma Evil Liberal Leftist™

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    5,377
    Thanks Received:
    757
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    On the street, acting all loud and tumultuous and
    Ratings:
    +757
    I don't know the law, but what you post here just doesn't pass the smell test.

    I found this listing some places that provide Alzheimer's care:

    http://www.seniorsforliving.com/alzheimers/

    Perhaps you should get as much information directly from the source (the facility, not your family member) and then contact these people below with your questions. If they can't handle it, surely they'd know where to direct you so you can get some answers.

    DOEA Long-Term Care Ombudsman
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009
  3. Emma
    Offline

    Emma Evil Liberal Leftist™

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    5,377
    Thanks Received:
    757
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    On the street, acting all loud and tumultuous and
    Ratings:
    +757
    These people should be able to help answer your questions:

    http://elderaffairs.state.fl.us/index.php

    Hell... don't wait til Monday. There is a toll-free number you can call right now. They might be able to give you some advice. Just so you know, financial exploitation is a form of elder abuse; if there's any sign of that (and I'm not saying there is, just that what you post here is suspicious) the state will jump on it.

    1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337)

    As far as your legal questions: Statewide Senior Legal Helpline:
    1-888-895-7873

    ETA: I'd call these people first. The ombudsman usually deals with those already in extended care of some sort and would probably direct you to them in any case.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009
  4. Gudrid
    Offline

    Gudrid Bilderbergs' Catcher

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    546
    Thanks Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ratings:
    +93
    Part of that is true. We're having to deal with it, and our grandparents house will be seized by the government when she passes away. Can't remember the exact name of the law - Medicaid or Medicare recovery or something like that? The rest of that - as far as the qualifications - that doesn't sound accurate to me, but I'm not certain. The stuff about there only a being a few attorney's, cost, etc., sounds fishy to me as well, but I can't say for sure. But the part about the assets going to to the government after death is true, and I don't think it's 10 years (but that varies from state to state). I know that if our uncle, who has power of attorney, had arranged to have the house switched into his name prior to the law going into effect (it went into effect after grandma was in the nursing home in our state), the government would not have been able to seize the house when she passes, or so said the attorney he consulted.
     
  5. toomuchtime_
    Offline

    toomuchtime_ Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    5,588
    Thanks Received:
    712
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Ratings:
    +2,005
    My information is a few years old, but I think you are confusing Medicare with Medicaid. If you're father paid payroll taxes for 40 quarters, he is eligible for Medicare at 65, and along with supplemental Medicare insurance, known as Medigap insurance, his medical expenses are covered, but not long term care in an assisted living facility or a nursing home.

    If your father has no long term care insurance, he will have to pay for the assisted living facility or nursing home himself until he has paid down nearly all of his assets, and then Medicaid will kick in and pay the for his long term care. He will have to sign over most of his SS/pension check to the facility. If the government believes he has given away any of his assets in order to qualify for Medicaid sooner, it will take legal action to recover those assets. I believe the test is that any assets given away within 36 months of applying for Medicaid are subject to the government's claim. Assets placed in certain kinds of irrevocable trusts more than 36 months before apply for Medicaid, if that is still the test period, will be safe and not effect his eligibility.

    If your father has substantial assets, you will want to contact an elder care attorney or a Medicaid attorney who is familiar with Florida Medicaid law.

    medicaid lawyer florida - Google Search

    elder care attorney florida - Google Search
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  6. Gudrid
    Offline

    Gudrid Bilderbergs' Catcher

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    546
    Thanks Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ratings:
    +93
  7. Emma
    Offline

    Emma Evil Liberal Leftist™

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    5,377
    Thanks Received:
    757
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    On the street, acting all loud and tumultuous and
    Ratings:
    +757
    Yeah, that 16K figure sounds awfully inflated, and besides that... most all attorney's will provide an initial consultation for free.
     
  8. Political Junky
    Online

    Political Junky Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    19,566
    Thanks Received:
    2,948
    Trophy Points:
    260
    Ratings:
    +5,542
    Sounds like you've been reading right wing propaganda.
    Didn't they mention he'll be put to death?
     
  9. Emma
    Offline

    Emma Evil Liberal Leftist™

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    5,377
    Thanks Received:
    757
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    On the street, acting all loud and tumultuous and
    Ratings:
    +757
    Aw, that was kinda rude. I think his concern is legitimate.
     
  10. Big Black Dog
    Offline

    Big Black Dog Gold Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    22,923
    Thanks Received:
    5,113
    Trophy Points:
    260
    Ratings:
    +5,740
    I live just outside of a small rural town in northwestern Illinois. The particular town I live outside of happens to have a very nice nursing home with a wing specifically designated for Alzeimer's patients. They do a wonderful job in caring for their patients. Being a small town, everybody knows everybody so they can agree that this place gives good care. I don't know of any big entry fee like you mentioned to get into the facility but I do think it costs about $2,000.00 a month. That part of what you said seems correct. Before you jump into anything costly, have a chat with your local clergy. They will know exactly who to refer you to for assistance in getting the right answers to your questions. Friends and family often have the very best of intentions when it comes to answering questions like this but many times don't have the correct information.
     

Share This Page