Harvard: Good Teachers Worth The Cost

Discussion in 'Education' started by PoliticalChic, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    1. WASHINGTON — Elementary- and middle-school teachers who help raise their students’ standardized-test scores seem to have a wide-ranging, lasting positive effect on those students’ lives beyond academics, including lower teenage-pregnancy rates and greater college matriculation and adult earnings, according to a new study that tracked 2.5 million students over 20 years.

    2. ...allowing for a deeper look at how much the quality of individual teachers matters over the long term.

    3. “That test scores help you get more education, and that more education has an earnings effect — that makes sense to a lot of people,”...differences in teachers mean differences in earnings.”

    4. ...“value-added ratings,” which measure the impact individual teachers have on student test scores. It is likely to influence the roiling national debates about the importance of quality teachers and how best to measure that quality.

    5. Many school districts, including those in Washington and Houston, have begun to use value-added metrics to influence decisions on hiring, pay and even firing.

    6. Detractors, most notably a number of teachers unions, say that isolating the effect of a given teacher is harder than it seems, and might unfairly penalize some instructors.

    7. Critics particularly point to the high margin of error with many value-added ratings, noting that they tend to bounce around for a given teacher from year to year and class to class. But looking at an individual’s value-added score for three or four classes, the researchers found that some consistently outperformed their peers.

    8. The average effect of one teacher on a single student is modest. All else equal, a student with one excellent teacher for one year between fourth and eighth grade would gain $4,600 in lifetime income, compared to a student of similar demographics who has an average teacher. The student with the excellent teacher would also be 0.5 percent more likely to attend college.

    9. Replacing a poor teacher with an average one would raise a single classroom’s lifetime earnings by about $266,000, the economists estimate. Multiply that by a career’s worth of classrooms.

    10. “If you leave a low value-added teacher in your school for 10 years, rather than replacing him with an average teacher, you are hypothetically talking about $2.5 million in lost income,” said Professor Friedman, one of the coauthors."
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/06/e...achers-to-lasting-gain.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1


    And this: "...even if imperfect, well-calculated value-added scores are an important part of evaluating teachers." Ibid.

    Data informs policy, as it should.
     
  2. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    STandardized testing plays an important role in informing us how well our educational systems are doing.

    That said, teaching to the standarized tests is counterproductive to real education.
     
  3. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Not at all.

    The reason that the unions don't want the results of their teaching made public, or used in evaluations, is because said data is dispositive.
     
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  4. FurthurBB
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    FurthurBB Member

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    True, standardized tests are an important way to see how well the system is doing, but too much, as can be seen by the mess in Florida, leaves children with an inability to actually learn how to think.
     
  5. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    I would be interested in seeing the basis of this post, if you have same.
     
  6. SayMyName
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    SayMyName Live, Love, Laugh.

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    Good teachers will come regardless of how little or how much we spend.

    The focus must be on the families with children and how they view education in the country. When education is valued, and order restored in the majority of our schools, academic progress will soar.

    Socrates did say, "When the student is ready, the teacher will appear."
     
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  7. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Diamond Member

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    Not teaching to the test doesn't seem to produce a "real education" either, so we'll settle for teaching to the test. At least kids will have some facts in their heads instead of a load of liberal mush.
     
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  8. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Diamond Member

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    What "mess in Florida" are you referring to?
     
  9. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Our friend BB seems to have misplaced the data that both of us asked for...

    but might be interested in this about content-rich currucula...

    1. "The “Massachusetts miracle,” in which Bay State students’ soaring test scores broke records, was the direct consequence of the state legislature’s passage of the 1993 Education Reform Act, which established knowledge-based standards for all grades and a rigorous testing system linked to the new standards. And those standards, Massachusetts reformers have acknowledged, are Hirsch’s legacy.

    2. In the new millennium, Massachusetts students have surged upward on the biennial National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)—“the nation’s report card,” as education scholars call it. On the 2005 NAEP tests, Massachusetts ranked first in the nation in fourth- and eighth-grade reading and fourth- and eighth-grade math. It then repeated the feat in 2007. No state had ever scored first in both grades and both subjects in a single year—let alone for two consecutive test cycles. On another reliable test, the Trends in International Math and Science Studies, the state’s fourth-graders last year ranked second globally in science and third in math, while the eighth-graders tied for first in science and placed sixth in math. (States can volunteer, as Massachusetts did, to have their students compared with national averages.) The United States as a whole finished tenth.

    3. Hirsch was also convinced that the problem of inadequate background knowledge began in the early grades. Elementary school teachers thus had to be more explicit about imparting such knowledge to students—indeed, this was even more important than teaching the “skills” of reading and writing, Hirsch believed. Hirsch’s insight contravened the conventional wisdom in the nation’s education schools: that teaching facts was unimportant, and that students instead should learn “how to” skills. …expanded the argument in a 1983 article, titled “Cultural Literacy,” in The American Scholar."
    E. D. Hirsch’s Curriculum for Democracy by Sol Stern, City Journal Autumn 2009

    Proof of the failure of progressive education.
     
  10. Swagger
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    Swagger Gold Member

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    Meanwhile, in the UK:

    By Angela Harrison
    Education correspondent, BBC News

    "Plans to make it easier for head teachers in England to sack underperforming staff are to go ahead from September, the government says. It says poor teachers could be removed within a term instead of a year, which can be the case at present. The Education Secretary, Michael Gove, says schools have been "tangled in red tape" for too long when dealing with struggling staff."

    Poor Teachers Face Tougher System Under Shake-up - BBC
     

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