Half of Americans consume almost no healthcare.

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by PoliticalChic, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    1. "Data released last week by two federal agencies — the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) — stripped the Obama health law of its constitutional and economic justifications, like an emperor with no clothes.

    2. The new facts should seal a victory for the parties challenging the Obama health law in the coming U.S. Supreme Court showdown and ignite voter rage next November against the president who lied to get the law passed.

    3. The AHRQ report on who consumes healthcare shatters the Obama administration’s constitutional justification for compelling all Americans to buy insurance.

    4. ...half of Americans consume almost no healthcare. Fifty percent of the population needs so little healthcare that they accounted for only 2.9 percent of healthcare spending in 2009. Looking only at Americans under age 65, the percentage of nonconsumers is even higher.

    5. Why should a majority of the under-65 population be subject to a health insurance requirement when they consume little or no healthcare? That is the reasoning behind the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals decision last August to strike down the Obama health law’s mandatory insurance provision.

    6. Judges Frank Hull and Joel Dubina called the Obama administration’s claim that everyone needs healthcare “a convenient sleight of hand,” meaning a lie. This week’s AHRQ report gives the Supreme Court Justices solid evidence to uphold the 11th Circuit ruling.

    7. The mandate turns insurers into private tax collectors, collecting mandatory premiums from the healthy to pay for politically popular benefits for the sick.

    8. To frighten the nation into passing the Affordable Care Act in 2010, the president falsely claimed that healthcare spending was “spiraling” and “skyrocketing.” He labeled it the domestic crisis of our time.

    9. Contrary to the president’s alarming words, healthcare spending was growing more slowly in 2009 and 2010 than at any other time in the last half century. A new report by CMS actuaries shows that spending inched up only 3.8 percent in 2009 and 3.9 percent the next year.

    10. Federal actuaries forecast health spending jumping a whopping 8.3 percent in 2014, the year most of the law takes effect, with annual increases thereafter averaging 6.2 percent until 2020. One reason is that people with private health plans will be compelled to prepay for more of their care with insurance, rather than opting for high deductibles and copays."
    New Data Strip Obama's Health Law of Its Rationales


    You're on, RedBeard...
     
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  2. Ernie S.
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    Ernie S. Platinum Member

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    I'm 62. In the last 5 years, the only medical care I needed was a trip to the eye doctor to remove a foreign body.
    $80 for the visit and $18 for a prescription. I paid cash.
     
  3. kiwiman127
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    kiwiman127 Comfortably Moderate Supporting Member

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    Regarding the health care costs claim:
     
  4. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Downgrading Health Care
    The administration has warned that soaring health spending threatens the stability of American families and the economy. These doomsday scenarios are untrue. Health care spending is increasing at more moderate rates than in previous decades. Spending increased 10.5 percent in 1970, 13 percent in 1980, and consistently less than 7 percent in each of the last five years, reaching a low of 6.1 percent a year ago. Each year since 1960, food and energy together have taken up a declining share of Americans' expenditures, while housing has taken up a steady share. This has enabled Americans to spend an increasing share of their budgets on another necessity, healthcare. These four necessities together consume the same share of American spending now (55%) as they did in 1960 (53%). As further evidence, Americans are increasing the share of their spending that goes to recreation. Moderate income families can be helped to buy health coverage with vouchers, refundable tax credits, or debit cards. That's a low risk, "fix what's broken" approach.
    Increases in healthcare expenditures:
    2003 8.6%
    2004 6.9%
    2005 6.5%
    2006 6.7%
    2007 6.1%
    Compare to 10.5% in 1970 and 13% in 1980
    The American Spectator : Downgrading American Medical Care


    Now, if you want to actually see an ever-increasing spiral of costs, check out college tuition.
     
  5. Caroljo
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    Caroljo Gold Member

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    I think our hospitals and Dr's are the ones forcing the healthcare to explode.....
    It's things like...my son had been seeing his dr for a few months and had no insurance. His office visits were $78.00 each time he went. When he got insurance through his new job, his Dr. was billing his insurance $130.00 for each visit. Something pretty stinky about that one......
     
  6. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Do you know how much of the $130.00 billed was allowable under the coverage?
     
  7. syrenn
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    syrenn BANNED

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    That would be one reason. Do you think it will be better when the Dr gets to bill the government? You know... the ones who think its fine to pay $1000 for a screw driver.


    Another reason health care is exploding is becasue of the ones not paying a penny for the care they get.
     
  8. AmericaFirst88
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    AmericaFirst88 Member

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    So why are health insurance premiums so expensive? Because insurance companies are profit-hungry monstrosities that control the price of healthcare.
     
  9. Ernie S.
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    Ernie S. Platinum Member

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    Insurance companies work on a very small margin, maybe 6% compared to Apple that runs at over 40%, But, well, bitch all you want about mean old ins. companies. There's an app for that.
     
  10. kiwiman127
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    kiwiman127 Comfortably Moderate Supporting Member

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    I'm so very surprised that The American Spectator would paint such as rosy picture. It's not like The American Spectator is ideologically driven. :cool:

    The annual Milliman Medical Index (MMI) measures the total cost of healthcare for a typical family of four covered by a preferred provider plan (PPO). The 2011 MMI cost is $19,393, an increase of $1,319, or 7.3% over 2010. Even though the rate of increase is slowing from prior years, it has taken fewer than nine years for such costs to more than double. In 2002, the cost of healthcare for the typical family of four was $9,235.
    http://publications.milliman.com/periodicals/mmi/pdfs/milliman-medical-index-2011.pdf

    Wow, did the average income double in during those nine years? No!
    As a previously posted graph clearly shows, that for decades the cost of health care has outpaced inflation by huge margins. Sadly, for the last decade or so, worker wages has not kept up wit the CPI. Given all of this, in the future, how is your typical working family going to be able to be able to buy health care insurance? How's a business going to be able to continue contributing to their employees health care plan?

    More and more businesses are moving to high deductible health care plans to their employees where the employee. The concept of high deductible plans is to get the consumer to pay closer attention to the costs as the consumer will be paying much of the costs until they hit there deductible threshold.

    This is a good move for businesss and the consumer as this approach is helping to hold down the increase cost of healthcare. The annual increase cost are still more than double inflation but they have slowed to that level. If this approach wasn't implemented the following may have happen or the date at least has been pushed back:

    Who will have health insurance in the year 2025?

    If current trends continue, U.S. health insurance costs will consume the average household's annual income by 2025. As health care becomes unaffordable for most people in the United States, it will be necessary to implement innovative models to move the system in a more equitable and sustainable direction.
    Who will have health insurance in the year 2025? -- The Robert Graham Center
     

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