Growing up too soon? Puberty strikes 7-year-old girls

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by strollingbones, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    The changes in Kiera’s body scared her parents. Though the 8-year-old seemed her usual chipper self, she’d started to develop headaches and acne. More alarming to her mom, Sharon, were the budding breasts on Kiera’s thin little chest.

    “I thought, she’s too young,” remembers the Pittsburgh mom. “She’s still fearful about sleeping by herself. An 8-year-old just isn’t mature enough to handle this.”

    For Kiera, whose last name is being withheld to protect her privacy, it was all so embarrassing. None of her friends seemed to be experiencing what she was. When they asked about the acne and her expanding chest, Kiera was evasive. “I didn’t want to tell them what was going on,” says the Pittsburgh girl, now age 9. “So I had to kind of lie to them.”

    When Kiera’s parents took their daughter to the doctor, he assured them that nothing was wrong with the girl. Kiera was simply starting puberty early.

    As it turns out, puberty at age 7 or 8 isn’t so unusual these days. A new study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, shows that more American girls are maturing earlier and earlier. Typically, U.S. girls hit puberty around age 10 or 11.

    Precocious puberty strikes more 7-year-old girls - Health - Kids and parenting - msnbc.com


    is it the hormonal addictives placed in foods? what is happening to cause this...its not natural at all.




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  2. xotoxi
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    xotoxi Platinum Member

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    Global warming.
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I've wondered about the hormones used in foods also. However, there seems to be more too it than that. Take a look at this chart found here: Average age of menarche, at the Museum of Menstruation and Women's Health

    [​IMG]
     
  4. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    that is an informative graph....you have to wonder however how much longer this can go on
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'd imagine it will or already has reached it plateau around 11 or 12. Seems diet in general had the most effect on age of onset. When people didn't have the opportunity for year round balanced diet, the body didn't kick in for reproduction so early.

    I'm just guessing, but would say that considering the correlation between wealthy countries and poor countries in modern era, makes sense.
     
  6. Middleman
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    Middleman Defender of the month

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    Part of the problem are endocrine disrupters emitted by plastics into our food. Part of the problem is hormones in our food and water. Part of the problem is obesity, since fat cells emit estrogen into the body.
     
  7. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    I think it might also have something to do with how healthy we are today compared to years ago. We've wiped out some diseases, we have more comfortable habitats, better medicine, we have an easier life and we live longer. Possibly the body is seeing this longer life and better health as a sign that the body is ready to mature at a quicker rate. It's an overall, cumulative thing, although I believe also that it's got a lot to do with the drugs and chemicals in our food and water.
     
  8. xotoxi
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    xotoxi Platinum Member

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    Actually, precocious puberty is not a sign of health. Middleman was correct in that environmental things and obesity are the causes of this problem.
     
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  9. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    Interesting... so should society make any sort of adjustments to this trend? Should physical maturity be equated with mental maturity?
     
  10. xotoxi
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    xotoxi Platinum Member

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    I think that society should encourage its participants to live healthier lives. Nothing should be mandated regarding this.

    If poisons in plastics are found, then manufacturing should find ways to eliminate them, like BPA-free bottles. They are already doing that.
     

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