Government Healthcare Disaster in UK

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Nonelitist, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. Nonelitist
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  2. rightwinger
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  3. Harry Dresden
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    Harry Dresden Latinum, Plantinum,Silver,Gold Member Supporting Member

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    every health care system on the planet has its problems.....its funny how the pro-UHC people,mostly only post the good shit from around the world,not mentioning the negative.....and the anti-UHC people usually only post the negative,ignoring the positive shit.....i guess i dont have to ask why this is......do i?....
     
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  5. Nonelitist
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    "The statistics used in WHO reports are also useless because there is no standardization of the data collection. For example, the US has a dismal infant mortality rate compared to European countries. However, in our country every baby that has a heartbeat is considered a living thing and is counted in the statistics. In Europe, however, it is not considered a live birth unless the infant is a certain size."

    "The WHO is a supporter of socialized healthcare, so their reports and their findings, not surprisingly, tend to favor socialized healthcare. The rankings are based on “developed” data and other subjective techniques. For example, one category in which the US does poorly (54th place) is “fairness.” Well, sure, that’s highly subjective, but who doesn’t want healthcare to be fair?"

    "Look at it this way. A healthcare system that allows some people to receive expensive and experimental treatment would not score as well in that category as a system that does not allow anyone to receive that treatment. According to the WHO, it is more fair for no one to receive experimental treatment than for it to be given to some people who are willing to pay for it."

    "Not only that, but when compiling numbers for the rankings, the WHO placed 65% of the weight of their study on equality. Remember that “equality” is a buzz word often used in place of socialism. In other words, the WHO does not consider a healthcare system to be legitimate and fair if it is not a socialized healthcare system, and people actually look at the WHO report as if it is an unbiased critique of global healthcare systems."

    Myth: The Brits have it figured out. We should follow the UK healthcare model.

    "Emergency rooms have gotten so backed up with patients that the government had to mandate that the hospitals see patients admitted to the ER within four hours. In order to meet this requirement, it has become common practice for ambulances to wait outside the hospital for hours before letting the patient into the emergency room, since that four-hour time limit doesn’t start until they walk through the hospital doors"

    "We’ve all heard the horror stories about people in the UK being on the waiting list for a medical procedure for a few years. Luckily, the government knew they had to do something about it and set a mandate that people who need surgery would be operated on within 6 short months. Oh, is that all? That’s not so long. Not surprisingly, shortening the wait time for some led to a longer wait time for others. Once the government mandate was passed, wait times in general increased by 20%. Some types of surgery got a lot worse, like orthopedic surgery, which increased by 143%. "

    "Unfortunately, this method of ranking healthcare is no more accurate than the WHO report. Not everyone who dies does so as the result of a disease, and many of those who do die from a disease that could not have been cured with preventive care. One reason for our low life expectancy is our country’s extremely high homicide rate. We also have 3 times as many people die, per capita, in car wrecks as in the Netherlands, for example. These are deaths that have nothing to do with a person’s physical health.

    As for the infant mortality rate, there are two things that severely skew those numbers. One thing is that, regardless of socioeconomic status, black people have much higher infant mortality rates than whites and Hispanics. No one knows why this is, but it’s safe to say that the fact is a contributing factor to our mortality rate being higher than, say, Sweden. The other thing skewing the numbers is how the numbers are tabulated. In the United States, a baby is considered alive if it has a heartbeat. That seems like a pretty good measure of life to me, but other countries have different standards for whether or not a baby is alive. Austria and Germany only count a baby as being alive if it’s at least 1 pound, and in much of Europe it has to be at least 12 inches long to be a live birth. In France, it’s not a live birth if the baby was in gestation for fewer than 26 weeks.

    So it seems that the infant mortality rate in European countries is lower than here because in Europe there are a whole lot of dead babies that were never counted as being alive. If those European countries counted their live births the same was as us and had the same cultural diversity, I think you’d find the numbers are drastically different."


    Myths of universal healthcare explained: part two


    WHO? haha.. .. only you good little socialists take what they say as meaning anything.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2010
  6. xsited1
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  7. rightwinger
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  8. Nonelitist
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    US has much better healthcare than Costa Rica and you know it.
     
  9. driveby
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  10. rightwinger
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    U.S. Health Care Costs:*Background Brief

    In 2007, U.S. health care spending was about $7,421 per resident and accounted for 16.2% of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP); this is among the highest of all industrialized countries.

    All to provide a healthcare system ranked 37 in the world
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2010

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