For Those Old Enough To Remember...

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by bayoubill, May 4, 2012.

  1. bayoubill
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    bayoubill aka Sheik Yerbouti... Supporting Member

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    tell us what you remember about day-to-day life in the era of segregation...

    and the reaction of your world to desegregation...
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2012
  2. bayoubill
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    bayoubill aka Sheik Yerbouti... Supporting Member

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    a few things I remember...

    my dentist had a separate entrance with a sign that said "Colored"...

    the movie theater had an outside stairway that had a sign that said "Colored"... (I remember being jealous of the colored folks 'cause they got to sit in the balcony...)

    there were places that had two water fountains, one with a sign that said "White" and one with a sign that said "Colored"... (btw, for those of you who've seen the movie "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman", it was filmed in my mother's home town of St. Francisville, LA, and that water fountain scene at the end was shot at the West Feliciana Parish Courthouse, just a few blocks from my grandmother's house...)
     
  3. Huey
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    Huey Silver Member

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    in philly we had those signs,but didn't obey them.Even in the prescence of whites we still used the restrooms,drinking fountains,and sat in the front of the bus.whites got indignant but that was all they did.The popo thought it was funny and never did anything.
     
  4. Amelia
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    Amelia BANNED

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    Well after segregation ended - specifically in the late 70's - my town in Alabama had a run down looking pool for the black kids and a very pleasant "country club" for the white kids. Not an expensive club. I think maybe only a nominal dues. Just understood that only white people should apply.

    And every town in the area had a private "academy" which was understood to be for white kids.

    At the public high school, the student offices and the homecoming and prom royalty were segregated -- there was a complete set of white officers and royalty, and a complete set of black officers and royalty. Have no idea what they would have done if a Mexican or Native American wanted to run for class president.





    I haven't been back to that town aside from one short trip in the 80's so I don't know if/when they ever truly desegregated.
     
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    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  5. Mr. H.
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    Mr. H. Diamond Member

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    Being from a small town with very few black families, I don't remember any such signs or restrictions. This was, for me, late 50's thru the 60's. Maybe my older brothers would remember differently.

    I do remember being told how my dad was basically ostracised by his friends for being nice to blacks in our town. He treated them like human beings. I remember him lecturing me to do the same.

    I do remember seing a white woman at the pharmacy lunch counter eating a donut with a fork while wearing white gloves. That fucked my head up for years.
     
  6. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    I was raised in the deep south during the 50's and 60's. What seems so strange to me was that black people seemed to be hated collectively but as individuals were often treated like members of the family.

    I was raised by our black maid. I probably spent more time with her in my early years than I did with my mother. She was in every sense a member of the family. She brought her kids over to our house to play. When her father died we attended the funeral. I think my dad bailed her husband out of jail when he got in a bar fight.

    But there were rules that you did not break. When she rode in our car with us, she never rode in the front seat, always in back. When I was very young, she took me downtown on the bus. We both sat together in back of the bus. Everyone seemed to realize that she was our maid taking care of me. But when I was older, I sat in the front of the bus and she sat in the rear. At least once a week in summer, she would take me swimming. She would of course stand outside the fenced area of the pool and wait for me. There was only one swimming pool in town and it was for whites only. I asked once why there was no swimming pool for black people. I was told black people are afraid of the water and building them a pool would be a waste of money. A lot of things were justified in those days by saying blacks wouldn't use it we gave it to them.

    When I went off to college, I forgot about her but see did not forget about me. I got a card from her on my birthday for many years. All that was many years ago. Today as I look back, I can say she was one of the most powerful influences on my life.

    I've been asked how could you just stand by and do nothing when such obvious injustices were so common. My only excuse is that's the way we were raised. We just assumed that's the way things were suppose to be.

    In this post I use the term black people or blacks; In those days, the term was Negro or ******, depending on the context but some times people would use the word colored.
     
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  7. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    In my hometown, it was the duty of the bus drive to see that the laws were obeyed. One reminder to sit in the back of the bus. If you didn't you walked.
     
  8. Huey
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    Huey Silver Member

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    you have to understand the majority of the bus drivers who drove certain buses were Black,thats how we got away with sitting up front.Philly wasn't hard nosed rascist like down south,mainly because we had a lot of race riots and the white kids lost alot of the time.
     
  9. Huey
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    Huey Silver Member

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    I saw that colored sign at the movie theater also.But the balcony was great for throwing water balloons at the peeps sitting below us.Sometimes we would put piss in them you should have heard the screams.Also you could sneak in without paying to see a movie.They took that sign down real fast.
     
  10. laughinReaper
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    laughinReaper Senior Member

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    I don't remember any of that but I live in the North and I was young in the 60's.
     

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