For A Federal Emergency Mortgage Relief Agency(?)!

Discussion in 'Economy' started by mascale, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. mascale
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    mascale VIP Member

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    Unimpressed as the public has become with the Ivy League concept of macro-economics--First central government applies the lubricant--then central government does the stimulus. People get $600,000.00 per year plus perks to know that. Rep Frank, and Lord Maynard Keynes: Likely know this, or did(?)!

    Accounting gimmicks need to be brought more to the forefront in the search for the Remedy to the attempt to extract usuury from the poor under the Recent ARM's crisis.

    Maybe, here is one.

    There is a glut of housing on the market, and there is an absence of housing on the market at the same time. Mortgage lenders seem to know this, so they don't(?). . .Do Mortgages.

    Foreclosures are cheap, and can be fllipped after remodels: If only someone could buy them. Underwater housing is cheap, and becomes an attractive asset value to have--If only (1) someone could buy them, and (2), owners could sell them.

    So An Emergency Mortgage Relief Agency would act positively as a short-term guarantor of credit--no money outlays, just a gurantor/co-signer. A Bondsman is a guarantor, for example, without offering up any money--just a promise.

    An Emergency Mortgage Relief Agency would act positively as a short-term co-signer for the difference between the mortgage amount, and the sales price. The seller could get out of the mortgage, only obligated to the underwater amount. The buyer pays off its part of the old mortgage in the sale. The Emergency Mortgage Relief Agency would accept a new "rental" agreement from the underwater owner, who would be offered a rental discount somewhere else. "In a Foreclosue" is an example. The bank would be a landlord, but the tenant would be the federal government, less likely to become a current victim.

    The underwater owner changes status from owner to renter, but just as likely at a reduced strain or even strain to the household budget, credit rating, scores and other looming obstancles. The bank has a property, with rich Uncle Sam as the tenant. The property can increase in value--with renting former owner increasingly less rent "underwater." The bank loses less, and the former underwater owner loses less--or even breaks even. Once the former owner renter moves on, then the bank can hold the property, or sell the property.

    The objective is housing price inflation. In that renter example, if the occupied property increases in value, then any managed sales price would go to the formerly underwaer amount, maybe with the renter having something left over.

    Essentially, The Emergency Mortgage Relief Agency would not be required to put up very much cash. The bank books would be asset relieved. All parties would remain credit-worthy. The housing market would be moving again.

    "Crow, James Crow: Shaken, Not Stirred!"
    (Clearly, Teaching is Not Possible At Any Grade Level Without The Doctoral Degree: Unless it is believed some kids are better than other kids, and that all the other kids are not worth the extra effort. Clearly, any of the foregoing is all unusable in the United States, at the direction of the schools!)
     

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