Food crisis in 2010 in U.S.?

Discussion in 'Economy' started by KentuckyThinker, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. KentuckyThinker
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    KentuckyThinker Member

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    I've read some articles, similar to the one linked, that say we may be in for a food crisis because of the fedgov's intervention into the pricing of produce, and also because of low crop yields. In the interest of being prudent, I've began to stock up on items I normally use. Even if a food shortage doesn't happen, at least I can have an abundance of products at today's prices instead of at inflated prices that I KNOW will be coming. How do you feel about this?

    2010 Food Crisis for Dummies « The Global Realm
     
  2. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    The only way I envision America having a problem with getting food is if the gubmint declares a need for "universal food".
     
  3. Truthmatters
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    Truthmatters BANNED

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    global warming will more likely be the cause of food insecurity
     
  4. Toro
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    Toro Diamond Member

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    There is no food crisis coming.

    If there is, the commodities markets sure doesn't know about it.
     
  5. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    hmm i disagree....americans have handled the production of food over to large corps....midland archer foundation for one.....regional small farms and dairiers are rarer now....and if small farms have to pay the 500 buck fee.. most will go under....small farms cant afford that fee....

    plus now you have food production centered in a few states....where are the gardens that use to exist....hell most people today dont cook much less have a clue about how to grow their own food.
    yea i can see a disruption of food supplies coming to pass.....
     
  6. Valerie
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    Valerie Gold Member

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    ConAgra's Feeding Frenzy
     
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  7. code1211
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    code1211 Senior Member

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    The only recent food crisis we have suffered was when the enlightened decided to save us from the Oil Cartel and started turning our food into gasoline. Gas efficiency drops, prices of everything from tortillas to Mountain Dew increase, the splash and dash laws allow the US to subsidize the price of gas sold in Europe and the Lagislators from the Corm Belt States get rich on the contributions from the Ethanol folks.

    Yet another disaster sponsored by the know nothings in DC.

    I hope I don't get sick after the Washington elite are in charge of healthcare. Very shortly, their stupidity really will be the death of me.
     
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  8. jakerobinson
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    jakerobinson Rookie

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    I find it amusing that some folks on here think there is 'nothing' to worry about...

    if you do watch commodities you would notice there are fundamental reasons why some crops are going to be scarce... many farmers will change crops when they no longer can make a profit growing something like rice - very plentiful now but will become more scarce as farmers choose not to plant... the price of that commodity will rise...

    there are several ag commods that are in this situation...

    With all the 'stimulus money' being borrowed and spent on do-nothin projects that do not stimulate anything but voter payoff's and coming inflation, once the velocity of the money paid to banks 'too big to fail' eventually enters the system... you will see the price of food go up...

    that's the price of food there is no a shortage of...

    price of oil per barrel is on the way back up... and projected to rise to heights that also impact the price of food: the price of distribution...

    Then add Gov't meddling like what happened in California where millions of pound of food rotted in the fields as the water was 'turned off' to save some minnows that are all dead by now (thank God for reproduction). This area of prime farmland is now barren and thousands of families are now bankrupt and scrambling to survive... This can continue to become a common occurrence... especially when congress is trying to expand it's powers to take over ALL WATER in the US... more regulation, more restrictions, more stupid miniature animals to save... more crops that won't be planted: - Congress Moves To Control All U.S. WaterNWV News - Congress Moves To Control All U.S. Water (add www) newswithviews.com/NWV-News/news167.htm

    Then throw in our very, very fragile 'JUST-IN-TIME' distribution chain...
    (add www) globalsecurity.org/security/ops/hsc-scen-3_pandemic-food-1.htm

    from the article: "The difference between
    civilization and anarchy is
    three days without food."


    why should your local grocer carry any more food than needs to be stocked on the shelf? They keep their inventory low - normally 3-5 days for very popular items and maybe up to 30 days for semipershible not as popular items...

    it takes a very sophiscticated computer software program and fine-tuned distribution system to track 30,000+ items to make sure perishable items can be at the store when shoppers will buy them before they perish...

    What happens when there is a serious power outage? Natural or manmade?

    What happens when oil goes to $150 to $200/bbl?

    What happens when a pandemic hits in an Asian nation during rice harvest? What if the crop can't be harvested? What impact will this have?

    If Terrorists decide to target the vernabilities of our JIT distribution a 'food shortage' could be manifested - even when food is available perishing somehwere..

    What happens if drought in one area, floods in another impact planting, growing or harvesting? What if multiple issues came together in a perfect storm?

    I for one would rather be safe than sorry...

    you guys thinking that global warming is a bigger threat or that this could never happen here - please know that I will protect my property with firearms...

    sound kooky?

    No worries, it will never happen, right? Since it won't then you wouldn't have any cause to come calling, right? So being prepared is of no threat to anyone...

    cheers,
     
  9. Barb
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    Barb Carpe Scrotum

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    Do you believe that life is an inalienable right?
     
  10. Barb
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    Barb Carpe Scrotum

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    If people need food to live, and they do, and life is a human right, and it is, then the right to food, the means to live, is also a human right.

    If everything has a price, and no one is entitled to the most basic of needs simply on ethical grounds, instability in markets have the potential to make famine a method of genocide. Is that an inappropriate phrase? There is a certain requirement for violence in the definition. However, it is hard not to connect the idea of exporting food while local people starve to death as anything less than an act of violence.



    Daly, H. and Farley, J. (2004) Ecological Economics: Principles and Applications Island Press, Washington DC, US
     

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