Flint Water Crisis

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Ame®icano, May 11, 2019.

  1. Ame®icano
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    Ame®icano Gold Member

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    Part One

    Most of us know the story but here is again... In a nutshell.

    Back in 2013, Flint City Council run by the Democrats, authorizes Flint to switch its water supply to Flint River water, with projection to save $5 million a year, and the switch is completed in 2014. Few months later, GM plant switched of Flint water to neighboring town, because their parts were corroding due to the high chlorine level.

    Next year, in 2015, Flint warns residents the water contains disinfectant byproducts that could increase their risk of getting cancer. The water is deemed safe to drink for the general population but the elderly and parents of young children are urged to consult their doctors. Weeks later, the old water supplier, The Detroit water system offers to reconnect Flint with its Lake Huron water supply and waive a $4 million reconnection fee but city officials decline because of concerns rates will be hiked significantly in the future.

    Meanwhile, Flint residents meet over concerns that the water is discolored and is causing rashes and otherwise sickening their children. The EPA notifies the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality 9MDEQ) that lead water levels are 7 times higher than normal. The following test show lead water level is more than 20 times higher than normal. EPA finds out that corrosion control treatment was not used to keep lead from leaching out of the system’s pipes.

    Because of that, Flint City Council votes to stop using river water and to reconnect with Detroit, but the state-appointed emergency manager overrules council. First lawsuits were filed.

    After months of testing find elevated lead in Flint water supply, the MDEQ orders the city to maximize its use of corrosion controls. The EPA announces it will help Flint develop a corrosion control treatment plan. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder announces Flint will stop using Flint River water, and in October 2015 Flint switches its water supply back to Detroit’s system.

    Early in 2016, ACLU and the Natural Resources Defense Council, filed a federal lawsuit against Michigan for alleged violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. Additional lawsuits were filed against Governor Snyder, and criminal charges are filed against three state and city officials.

    End of 2016, ACLU files a class action lawsuit against Flint schools for exposing students to lead tainted water and inadequately testing them for learning disabilities caused by lead in the water. In January 2017 The MDEQ states that six month tests show lead levels in Flint’s water meet federal drinking water standards.

    In February 2017 Michigan Civil Rights Commission finds "deeply embedded institutional, systemic and historical racism" contributed to the Flint water crisis. The EPA gives Flint a $100 million grant to upgrade its water system infrastructure. In addition, a federal judge approves a $97 million settlement that requires Michigan to pay for the replacement of approximately 18,000 residential water service lines in Flint by January 2020.

    But is it over? See part two.
     
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  2. Ame®icano
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    Ame®icano Gold Member

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    Part Two

    The company Flint, Michigan, hired to replace lead water pipes had no experience with the work, despite that the city has received more than $600 million in state and federal aid for its water crisis. The city also prohibited contractors from using an efficient method of digging holes known as hydrovac excavation, that is also much cheaper.

    The reason for banning hydrovac is to level the playing field so the black-owned firm with no experience, can get the contracts. That company threw out the maps of where lead pipes were, and dig up every single yard and sidewalk w/ an extremely slow, archaic method. They get $3,000+ for every hole they dig (vs. $250 per hole using modern and efficient hydrovac which mayor banned), so they destroyed the entire city for no other reason than profit.

    Flint gave contract to firm with no pipe replacement experience

    But wait, there is more.

    Flint Mayor Karen Weaver asked employees to redirect charitable donors to a nonprofit fund she created shortly after taking office. The nonprofit was created as a 527 organization, usually a form of campaign fund created for politicians. Under federal law, a 527 account isn’t required to register or report to the state, can accept direct corporate contributions and is only obliged to report donors and expenditures if contributions exceed $25,000 in a year.

    Flint mayor asked city employees to divert donations to her nonprofit, witness testifies
     
  3. cnm
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    cnm Diamond Member

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    Best government money can buy.
     
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  4. Dont Taz Me Bro
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    Dont Taz Me Bro USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    This isn’t a current event
     
  5. Ame®icano
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    Ame®icano Gold Member

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    It is. Read the second post.
     
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