Excellent Op-Ed on Military and Educational Crossovers

Discussion in 'Military' started by Annie, May 14, 2005.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    http://www.opinionjournal.com/editorial/feature.html?id=110006682

     
  2. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    I am going to partially disagree with the author in a couple of areas.

    First is the connotation he gives to the word "leader". The majority of leadership within the US Military is of the enlisted variety and don't come from the college pipeline. I cannot speak for the other services, but Marines begin leadership training as soon as they are eligible for promotion to Corporal (paygrade E4). Professional Military Education (PME) ranges from five seperate leadership academies (Cpls Course, Sgt's Course, Staff NCO Career Course, Staff NCO Advanced Course, and the E8/E9 Seminars) a professional reading program designed to build thinking leaders, and non-resident correspondence courses.

    The author notes that wars change, and that is very true. But in reality there is enough in-house education that we could lose the ROTC aspect, and by retaining the combat experience still have a Platoon Sergeant able to lead a MOUT campaign and a Battalion Sergeant Major that can assist young Lieutenants as they grasp the operational level of a new threat (counterinsurgency for example).

    I would go so far as to say that the best officers I ever worked with were Mustangs. They had one complete (at a minimum) enlistment and had worked up to the NCO ranks. Then they got educated. Then they got commissioned. An excellent synthesis or book and street smarts.

    I concur that the resident courses from the enlisted PME up to the Command and Staff College should remain. I simply don't think that ROTC builds good officers any more than any college experience. In fact, except for the legal aspects of funding, I would kick the more liberal colleges to the curb as not worthy of a military presence. They have already tainted themselves.
     
  3. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    Well said. The Army is very much like the Marine Corps in it's leadership training. There are mandatory residency courses and for each NCO rank and many, many combination resident/non-resident leadership courses required as well. Also, the Army encourages formal civilian education to the point where today it is almost a must have to get promoted beyond E-5 (sergeant). I have no idea what the Navy and Air Force does in this regard.
     

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