Even Money Is A Bad Bet

Discussion in 'Congress' started by Flanders, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    Taqiyya the Liar had to go to the American University to find a friendly audience for his Iran Deal. I only found out about it because he popped up on television —— AGAIN.

    I am outta there as soon he shows up; so I was somewhat surprised that his little sales pitch got the coverage it is getting. Curiosity made me skip through the transcript because I am interested in how the Iran Deal is going to be shoved down the public’s throat. He will need everything he can sum up because the Congress does not have pass it find to out what is in it.

    My mother did not raise a fool. Even with the details out there for all to see, I expect his veto to stand up. I also expect the usual media Kabuki dance covering the president’s veto. All things considered, I smelled a good bet.

    As soon as I perused the nonsense in the transcript, I called my maker for the early morning line on the Iran Deal veto. The odds quoted were even money. Much to my chagrin even-up was prohibitive. With all of the negative publicity against the Iran Deal, I expected to realize at least a 5 to my 1. Inside information told me that the Chicago sewer rat’s highly-touted powers of persuasion will pull it out with a vote or two to spare. Sad to say, the maker is privy to the same information I had. Bottom line: I was unable to talk Guido into a few extra points for a valued customer.

    Anyway, the entire address is a surefire barf for the strongest of constitutions; so I only grabbed a few paragraphs to paraphrase to get to the gist what he really means. Let me begin with the one that has Congress offended:


    In fact, it's those hardliners who are most comfortable with the status quo. It's those hardliners chanting "Death to America" who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.​

    In fact, hardliners in Congress force me to use language designed to bring them in line just as I did to the Supreme Court in a State of the Union Address.

    Under Democratic and Republican presidents, new agreements were forged: A nonproliferation treaty that prohibited nations from acquiring nuclear weapons, while allowing them to access peaceful nuclear energy, the SALT and START treaties, which bound the United States and the Soviet Union to cooperation on arms control.​

    I forged new agreements that bound the United States to cooperation with our enemies. United Nations approval is the only thing I needed to insure cooperation. That is why I did not submit the Iran Deal to Congress as a treaty.

    The agreement now reached between the international community and the Islamic Republic of Iran builds on this tradition of strong, principled policy diplomacy.​

    The agreement reached between the United Nations and the United States builds on surrendering our sovereignty diplomatically.

    After two years of negotiations, we have achieved a detailed arrangement that permanently prohibits Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. It cuts off all of Iran's pathways to a bomb. It contains the most comprehensive inspection and verification regime ever negotiated to monitor a nuclear program.​

    After two years of negotiations, we have achieved an arrangement that permits Iran to obtain nuclear weapons in a few years. The deal removes all obstacles. It contains no inspections or verification regime.

    Now, when I ran for president eight years ago as a candidate who had opposed the decision to go to war in Iraq, I said that America didn't just have to end that war. We had to end the mindset that got us there in the first place.​

    When I ran for president I opposed going to war for self-defense, I still say that Americans have to end war by not defending themselves.

    More than a decade later, we still live with the consequences of the decision to invade Iraq. Our troops achieved every mission they were given, but thousands of lives were lost, tens of thousands wounded. That doesn't count the lives lost among Iraqis. Nearly a trillion dollars was spent.​

    More than a decade later, I turned victory into defeat regardless of the American lives lost.

    Today, Iraq remains gripped by sectarian conflict, and the emergence of al-Qaida in Iraq has now evolved into ISIL. And ironically, the single greatest beneficiary in the region of that war was the Islamic Republic of Iran, which saw its strategic position strengthened by the removal of its long-standing enemy, Saddam Hussein.​

    Today, al-Qaida in Iraq has now evolved into ISIL thanks to me. Once again thanks to me, the single greatest beneficiary of the war in Iraq is Iran getting nuclear weapons.

    But if we are serious about confronting Iran's destabilizing activities, it is hard to imagine a worse approach than blocking this deal. Instead, we need to check the behavior that we are concerned about directly, by helping our allies in the region strengthen their own capabilities to counter a cyber attack or a ballistic missile, by improving the interdiction of weapons' shipments that go to groups like Hezbollah, by training our allies' special forces so they can more effectively respond to situations like Yemen.​

    Make no mistake about the Iran Deal. I did not need a United Nations treaty to check Iran’s behavior, or increase interdiction of weapons' shipments going to terrorist groups. What I did need was to improve the United Nations’ image as the world’s peacekeeper.

    One that relies on vague promises of toughness and, more recently, the argument that we can apply a broader and indefinite set of sanctions to squeeze the Iranian regime harder. Those making this argument are either ignorant of Iranian society, or they are not being straight with the American people. Sanctions alone are not going to force Iran to completely dismantle all vestiges of its nuclear infrastructure, even aspects that are consistent with peaceful programs. That, is oftentimes, is what the critics are calling a better deal.​

    Fools who rely on the toughness of self-defense naturally appeal to self-interest. Iran’s self-interest is noble and should not be confused with the self-interest opponents of the Iran Deal rely on.

    What's more likely to happen should Congress reject this deal is that Iran would end up with some form of sanctions relief without having to accept any of the constraints or inspections required by this deal. So in that sense, the critics are right. Walk away from this agreement, and you will get a better deal -- for Iran.​

    Should Congress accept this deal, a nuclear Iran in the future will join the International community in a wave of peace and brotherly love.

    So let's not mince words. The choice we face is ultimately between diplomacy or some form of war. Maybe not tomorrow, maybe not three months from now, but soon.​

    Let’s not mince words. I have never lied to the American people, and I have no intention of lying them about the Iran Deal.

    If Congress kills this deal, we will lose more than just constraints on Iran's nuclear deal or the sanctions we have painstakingly built. We will have lost something more precious: America's credibility as a leader of diplomacy. America's credibility is the anchor of the international system.​

    If Congress accepts the Iran Deal, we will gain United Nations credibility as the anchor of the international system.

    My fellow Americans, contact your representatives in Congress, remind them of who we are, remind them of what is best in us and what we stand for so that we can leave behind a world that is more secure and more peaceful for our children.​

    My fellow Democrats, contact your representatives in Congress, remind them of what is best for the United Nations.

     
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  2. The Irish Ram
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    The Irish Ram LITTLE GIRL / Ram Tough

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    I heard him hold Israel hostage. "If Congress doesn't pass his Iran deal, Israel will be attacked, and it will be the Republican's fault" arm twisting approach.
    Let Israel worry about Israel, Mr. President. They are convinced your deal puts them in harms way, not make them safer. You lying Muslim.
     
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  3. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    To The Irish Ram: Right on.
    To The Irish Ram: That’s why I call him Taqiyya the Liar.
     
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  4. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    Most Americans know what the Chicago sewer rat is by now. What Americans do not know is why the audience at American University applauded the liar. The reason is simple. Year after year a substantial number of AU’s graduates go to parasite jobs in government. Their greatest fear is limited government.

    American University is especially known for promoting international understanding reflected in the diverse student body from more than 150 countries, the university’s course offerings, the faculty's research, and from the regular presence of world leaders on its campus. The university has six unique schools, including the well-regarded School of International Service (SIS), currently ranked 8th in the world for its graduate programs and 9th in the world for its undergraduate program in International Affairs by Foreign Policy, and the Washington College of Law.


    Indeed, every student in schools for government is trained for a parasite job.

    Parenthetically, with so many parasites educated to promote and legitimate non-existent international law it is no wonder that a fantasy is gradually becoming a reality.

     

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