Europe to be in loop on foreign policy: Kennedy

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Stephanie, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    46 minutes ago

    :rolleyes:
    ROME (Reuters) - Europe will be kept more in the loop about U.S. foreign policy after mid-term elections which swept away Republican control of Congress, senior Democratic party member Senator Edward Kennedy said on Thursday.
    Kennedy, the Democratic senator for Massachusetts and the younger brother of former President John F. Kennedy, said his party's newly won control of the U.S. House of Representatives would bring a desire for greater involvement.

    "There is a new game in the United States now," he told reporters after meeting Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi.

    "There is a new desire to have more involvement, where the Democrats will be participating in foreign policy...to a much greater extent. I think we have ideas that are constructive and positive," he said in Rome.

    Kennedy was asked if the Democrats' mid-term election victory would lead to better dialogue between the United States and European countries, some of whom felt excluded from decisions regarding the war in Iraq.

    "I think we are dealing with the situation. I was personally opposed to the war but that was yesterday," he said. "I think that what we are trying to do now is (decide) how we proceed now. That's really the challenge."

    Asked if Europe would be kept more in the foreign policy loop than in the past, he said: "Absolutely."

    Kennedy is in Italy to attend 40th anniversary commemorations of the 1966 floods that devastated parts of the city of Florence and led to an international effort to save precious works of art and manuscripts.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061109/pl_nm/usa_elections_kennedy_dc_1
     
  2. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    last time i checked, foreign policy was mainly delegated to the President. True Congress has an important role with approving treaties. but can the Senate really do this?
     
  3. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    Don't you know???? All that talk about undermining the US Constitution only applies when the Republicans do anything. Such rhetoric does not apply (nor does the Constitution) when it is time for the Dems to want something.

    Not too hard to figure out really...didn't you read the Article that says libs and Dems are exempt from the Supreme Law of the land?
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Hey most of the Europeans are able to read the NY Times, all they need to know.
     
  5. Mr.Conley
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    Mr.Conley Senior Member

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    The Constitution gives the President the power to negotiatetreaties and greet foriegn dignitaries.

    The Constitution gives the Senate the power to consent on treaties and, as evidenced by the Senate and House Foreign Relations Committees, oversee our foriegn affairs jointly with the President.
    No, no, no, no.
    No one is going against the Constitution.
     

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