Encyclopaedia Britannica Kills its Print Edition

Discussion in 'Education' started by Sunni Man, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. Sunni Man
    Offline

    Sunni Man Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Messages:
    40,001
    Thanks Received:
    5,328
    Trophy Points:
    1,860
    Location:
    Patriotic American Muslim
    Ratings:
    +12,444
    The first Encyclopaedia Britannica was printed in 1768. And now, 244 years later, it has been printed for the last time. At least as a set of bound books.

    Its publisher has announced that it will no longer be publishing the print version, and will stop selling it when current stock runs out. It will continue to publish a digital version, which can be accessed on its website and through its iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch apps.

    The digital option costs $70 a year, while the last printed version cost $1,400.
    Britannica has printed a new version of the reference books every two years; the 2010 32-volume set will be the last.

    “This is a decision we have been contemplating for a few years. We decided to break the news now as it was time to release a new printed version,” Jorge Cauz, the president of Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc., told ABC News.

    Over 7 million sets of the bound books have been sold since 1768. Twelve thousand copies of the last set were printed, although 4,000 still remain in inventory. Britannica expects those remaining books to sell quickly.

    The end of the bound encyclopedias, which lined many bookshelves for years, is certainly a sign of the times. As services like Wikipedia gain steam, the idea of using a book to look up the history of, say, a presidential candidate seems rather quaint.

    Still, Cauz said the Britannica brand is strong in the digital space, but the focus goes beyond encyclopedia content. “Eighty-five percent of our revenue comes from non-encyclopedia content — mostly from instructional and e-learning solutions,” he said. The company works with schools to provide its learning tools.

    But of course, Wikipedia has taken over a large chunk of the digital encyclopedia market. “We have a very different offering than Wikipedia; our content is mostly created by experts and editors,” Cauz said. ”I understand Wikipedia has won the popularity contest, and Google loves Wikipedia in regard to search. We need to do something so we can be more prominent.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/03/encyclopaedia-britannica-kills-its-print-edition/
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. uscitizen
    Offline

    uscitizen Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    45,941
    Thanks Received:
    4,791
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    My Shack
    Ratings:
    +4,807
    Much easier now to revise embaressing history.
     
  3. Sunni Man
    Offline

    Sunni Man Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Messages:
    40,001
    Thanks Received:
    5,328
    Trophy Points:
    1,860
    Location:
    Patriotic American Muslim
    Ratings:
    +12,444
    Grew up with a set of Britannica's in our home.

    I remember spending hours just thumbing threw them and looking at the pictures.

    They were almost an education in themselves.
     
  4. theDoctorisIn
    Online

    theDoctorisIn Senior Mod Staff Member Senior USMB Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    30,007
    Thanks Received:
    5,791
    Trophy Points:
    1,140
    Location:
    East, but still West
    Ratings:
    +11,948
    Me too.

    I still have a full set in my mother's basement, waiting for me to have somewhere to put it.
     
  5. syrenn
    Offline

    syrenn BANNED

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    47,839
    Thanks Received:
    10,387
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +10,404

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]




    Wow. This is just so sad.
     
  6. Mr. H.
    Offline

    Mr. H. Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    44,117
    Thanks Received:
    9,265
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    A warm place with no memory.
    Ratings:
    +15,395
    Oh noze. A sad testament to the electronic age.

    One of my first jobs out of college (Class of Ought-77) was selling encyclopedias in rural Appalachia.
    They couldn't afford them, and they sure as hell couldn't read. What a challenge that was.

    Newspapers may be next.
     
  7. old navy
    Offline

    old navy <<< Action Figures

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,740
    Thanks Received:
    378
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    U.S.
    Ratings:
    +379
    Growing up the child of a teenager in the 60s did not allow for much extra. My grandmother though had a set of World Book encylopedias that I spent hours thumbing through. I could tell you the GDP of Ethiopia long before I knew what GDP was. Knowing the main exports of Columbia (besides the obvious) when most kids did not know where Columbia was even located came in handy on occasion. I was deployed when my grandmother died and I couldn't make it back for the funeral. By the time I got home, all her possessions had been picked over and the World Books had been thrown out. I was pissed but they were just books. I have since discovered the Internet.
     
  8. strollingbones
    Offline

    strollingbones Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2008
    Messages:
    65,657
    Thanks Received:
    15,626
    Trophy Points:
    2,190
    Location:
    chicken farm
    Ratings:
    +31,970
    it is simply a war on books....combined with the high cost of printing....
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  9. Mr. H.
    Offline

    Mr. H. Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    44,117
    Thanks Received:
    9,265
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    A warm place with no memory.
    Ratings:
    +15,395
    Little sis is freaking because hubby may lose his job at newspaper due to electronic media.
     
  10. psikeyhackr
    Offline

    psikeyhackr VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    745
    Thanks Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings:
    +71
    I still have a set, 1986. I bought them used in 1992.

    Benjamin Franklin's birthday has not changed.

    But paper is obsolete. Every family should have a 100 gigabyte database in their homes. Kids should be able to access data without being bombarded with commercials over the Internet.

    But who decides on what 100 gig of data?

    psik
     

Share This Page