Emerging Consensus Shows Climate Change Already Having Major Effects

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Trakar, Dec 31, 2012.

  1. Trakar
    Offline

    Trakar VIP Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    1,699
    Thanks Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +73
    Emerging Consensus Shows Climate Change Already Having Major Effects on Ecosystems and Species
    Released: 12/18/2012 11:45:00 AMContact Information:
    U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
    Office of Communications and Publishing
    12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
    Reston, VA 20192Catherine Puckett, USGS[​IMG]
    Phone: 352-377-2469

    Aileo Weinmann, NWF
    Phone: 202-797-6801

    Sandra Leander, ASU
    Phone: 480-965-9865




    In partnership with: National Wildlife Federation, Arizona State University
    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    4





    Plant and animal species are shifting their geographic ranges and the timing of their life events – such as flowering, laying eggs or migrating – at faster rates than researchers documented just a few years ago, according to a technical report on biodiversity and ecosystems used as scientific input for the 2013 Third National Climate Assessment.
    The report, Impacts of Climate Change on Biodiversity, Ecosystems, and Ecosystem Services, synthesizes the scientific understanding of the way climate change is affecting ecosystems, ecosystem services and the diversity of species, as well as what strategies might be used by natural resource practitioners to decrease current and future risks. More than 60 federal, academic and other scientists, including the lead authors from the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Wildlife Federation and Arizona State University in Tempe, authored the assessment.
    "These geographic range and timing changes are causing cascading effects that extend through ecosystems, bringing together species that haven't previously interacted and creating mismatches between animals and their food sources," said Nancy Grimm, a scientist at ASU and a lead author of the report.
    Grimm explained that such mismatches in the availability and timing of natural resources can influence species' survival; for example, if insects emerge well before the arrival of migrating birds that rely on them for food, it can adversely affect bird populations. Earlier thaw and shorter winters can extend growing seasons for insect pests such as bark beetles, having devastating consequences for the way ecosystems are structured and function. This can substantially alter the benefits people derive from ecosystems, such as clean water, wood products and food.
    "The impact of climate change on ecosystems has important implications for people and communities," said Amanda Staudt, a NWF climate scientist and a lead author on the report. "Shifting climate conditions are affecting valuable ecosystem services, such as the role that coastal habitats play in dampening storm surge or the ability of our forests to provide timber and help filter our drinking water."
    Another key finding is the mounting evidence that population declines and increased extinction risks for some plant and animal species can be directly attributed to climate change. The most vulnerable species are those already degraded by other human-caused stressors such as pollution or exploitation, unable to shift their geographic range or timing of key life events, or that have narrow environmental or ecological tolerance. For example, species that must live at high altitudes or live in cold water with a narrow temperature range, such as salmon, face an even greater risk due to climate change.
    "The report clearly indicates that as climate change continues to impact ecological systems, a net loss of global species’ diversity, as well as major shifts in the provision of ecosystem services, are quite likely," said Michelle Staudinger, a lead author of the report and a USGS and University of Missouri scientist.
    For example, she added, climate change is already causing shifts in the abundance and geographic range of economically important marine fish. "These changes will almost certainly continue, resulting in some local fisheries declining or disappearing while others may grow and become more valuable if fishing communities can find socially and economically viable ways to adapt to these changes."
    Natural resource managers are already contending with what climate change means for the way they approach conservation. For example, the report stated, land managers are now more focused on the connectivity of protected habitats, which can improve a species’ ability to shift its geographic range to follow optimal conditions for survival.
    "The conservation community is grappling with how we manage our natural resources in the face of climate change, so that we can help our ecosystems to continue meeting the needs of both people and wildlife," said Bruce Stein, a lead author of the report and director of climate adaptation at the National Wildlife Federation.
    Other key findings of the report include:
    • Changes in precipitation and extreme weather events can overwhelm the ability of natural systems to reduce or prevent harm to people from these events. For example, more frequent heavy rainfall events increase the movement of nutrients and pollutants to downstream ecosystems, likely resulting not only in ecosystem change, but also in adverse changes in the quality of drinking water and a greater risk of waterborne-disease outbreaks.
    • Changes in winter have big and surprising effects on ecosystems and their services. Changes in soil freezing, snow cover and air temperature affect the ability of ecosystems to store carbon, which, in turn, influences agricultural and forest production. Seasonally snow-covered regions are especially susceptible to climate change because small precipitation or temperature shifts can cause large ecosystem changes. Longer growing seasons and warmer winters are already increasing the likelihood of pest outbreaks, leading to tree mortality and more intense, extensive fires. Decreased or unreliable snowfall for winter sports and recreation will likely cause high future economic losses.
    • The ecosystem services provided by coastal habitats are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise and more severe storms. The Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts are most vulnerable to the loss of coastal protection services provided by wetlands and coral reefs. Along the Pacific coast, long-term dune erosion caused by increasing wave heights is projected to cause problems for communities and for recreational beach activities. However, other kinds of recreation will probably improve due to better weather, with the net effect being that visitors and tourism dollars will shift away from some communities in favor of others.
    • Climate change adaptation strategies are vital for the conservation of diverse species and effective natural resource policy and management. As moreadaptive management approaches are developed, resource managers can enhance the country’s ability to respond to the impacts of climate change through forward-looking and climate science-informed goals and actions.
    • Ecological monitoring needs to be improved and better coordinated among federal and state agencies to ensure the impacts of climate change are adequately monitored and to support ecological research, management, assessment and policy. Existing tracking networks in the United States will need to improve coverage through time and in geographic area to detect and track climate-induced shifts in ecosystems and species.
    Background:
    Federal law requires that the U.S. Global Change Research Program submit an assessment of climate change and its impacts to the President and the Congress once every four years. Technical reports, articles and books – such as this report -- underpin the corresponding chapters of the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment, due out in 2013. This technical report is available at the USGCRP website, as are other completed technical reports. Additional lead authors of this report include Shawn Carter, USGS: F. Stuart Chapin III, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Peter Kareiva, The Nature Conservancy; and Mary Ruckelshaus, Natural Capital Project.
     
  2. waltky
    Online

    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Messages:
    20,887
    Thanks Received:
    1,791
    Trophy Points:
    215
    Location:
    Okolona, KY
    Ratings:
    +3,884
    Granny says, "Dat's right - The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak...
    :eusa_eh:
    US climate worries rise, political action wanes, experts say
    Mon, Jan 21, 2013 - Climate change was thrust to the forefront of the US political agenda recently in the wake of the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy and record high temperatures across the country.
     
  3. SSDD
    Offline

    SSDD Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    7,927
    Thanks Received:
    820
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Ratings:
    +2,542
    And is this unprecedented in the history of the earth? Can you point to any proof that it is due to our burning of fossil fuels?
     
  4. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,552
    Thanks Received:
    5,424
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,366
    Yes, the rapid rise of GHGs in the atmosphere is unprecedented in the geologic history of the Earth. Not in the P-T Extinction Event, not in the T-J Extinction Event, and not in the PETM event did the GHGs rise as fast at they are have risen in the last 150 years.

    Methane catastrophe

    Yes, we can easily prove that the rise in CO2 is due to the burning of fossil fuels. First, we know from records how much coal, petroleum, and natural gas we have burned. Very easy to figure how much CO2 that each ton, barrel, or cubic foot produces. Second, we know that the isotopal distribution of Carbon isotopes is differant for these sources of sequestered carbon than it is for the carbon in the natural carbon cycle. And we are seeing the change in the isotopal ratio in the carbon in the atmosphere reflecting that differance.
     
  5. SSDD
    Offline

    SSDD Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    7,927
    Thanks Received:
    820
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Ratings:
    +2,542
    So you say. Lets see the proof. History tells us that for most of earth history, atmospheric CO2 has been well above 1000 PPM. Was there any runaway warming during most of earth hstory?
     
  6. Old Rocks
    Offline

    Old Rocks Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    46,552
    Thanks Received:
    5,424
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Portland, Ore.
    Ratings:
    +10,366
    Really stupid. What we are talking about here is a rapid increase in the CO2. That involves a rapidly changing climate, one that is inimical to an agriculture that is supposed to support 7 billion people.

    As for proof of the source of the CO2, that has been presented many times in links to scientific sources by myself and many others. In the meantime, you have presented nothing but flap-yap for your point of view.
     
  7. CrusaderFrank
    Offline

    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    81,265
    Thanks Received:
    14,919
    Trophy Points:
    2,210
    Ratings:
    +37,068
    Dark Matter causes Climate Change
     
  8. CrusaderFrank
    Offline

    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Messages:
    81,265
    Thanks Received:
    14,919
    Trophy Points:
    2,210
    Ratings:
    +37,068
    What's the average temperature of Mars?
     
  9. RollingThunder
    Offline

    RollingThunder VIP Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Messages:
    4,398
    Thanks Received:
    415
    Trophy Points:
    85
    Ratings:
    +886
    Hey CrazyFruitcake, do you ever get tired of posting meaningless drivel? Ohhhhh.....right.....silly question......you're far too retarded to get tired of doing idiotic things.....
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  10. SSDD
    Offline

    SSDD Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    7,927
    Thanks Received:
    820
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Ratings:
    +2,542
    I asked for proof and can't help but notice that you didn't provide any. It is a trend with you guys.....ask for proof, get nothing but name calling. Ever wonder why that might be?
     

Share This Page