Economy of mexico

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by LilOlLady, May 22, 2010.

  1. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    ECONOMY OF MEXICO


    The economy of Mexico is the 13th largest in the world. Since the 1994 crisis, administrations have improved the country's macroeconomic fundamentals. Mexico was not significantly influenced by the recent 2002 South American crisis, and maintained positive, although low, rates of growth after a brief period of stagnation in 2001. However, Mexico was one of the Latin American nations most affected by the 2009 recession with its Gross Domestic Product contracting by more than 6%. Moody's (in March 2000) and Fitch IBCA (in January 2002) issued investment-grade ratings for Mexico's sovereign debt. In spite of its unprecedented macroeconomic stability, which has reduced inflation and interest rates to record lows and has increased per capita income, enormous gaps remain between the urban and the rural population, the northern and southern states, and the rich and the poor.[6] Some of the government's challenges include the upgrade of infrastructure, the modernization of the tax system and labor laws, and the reduction of income inequality.
    The economy contains rapidly developing modern industrial and service sectors, with increasing private ownership. Recent administrations have expanded competition in ports, railroads, telecommunications, electricity generation, natural gas distribution and airports, with the aim of upgrading infrastructure. As an export-oriented economy, more than 90% of Mexican trade is under free trade agreements (FTAs) with more than 40 countries, including the European Union, Japan, Israel, and much of Central and South America. The most influential FTA is the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which came into effect in 1994, and was signed in 1992 by the governments of the United States, Canada and Mexico. In 2006, trade with Mexico's two northern partners accounted for almost 90% of its exports and 55% of its imports.[7] Recently, the Congress of the Union approved important tax, pension and judicial reforms, and reform to the oil industry is currently being debated. According to the Forbes Global 2000 list of the world's largest companies in 2008, Mexico had 16 companies in the list.
    Mexico Economy, Mexican Economy, Mexico's Economic Profile | EconomyWatch.com

    Oil and Gas
    In 2008, Mexico was the world's seventh-largest crude exporter, and the third-largest supplier of oil to the U.S. Oil and gas revenues provided more than one-third of all Mexican Government revenues.

    Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, holds a constitutionally established monopoly for the exploration, production, transportation, and marketing of the nation's oil. With its primary known oil reserves already in serious decline, Mexico still must determine in the near future how it wants to exploit probable deepwater reserves in order to avoid very difficult economic choices. The Mexican Congress passed energy reform legislation in October 2008 that gives Pemex more budgetary autonomy and transparency. However, the reforms do
    not open the petroleum sector to private sector investment. Mexico also imports finished petroleum products such as gasoline, due to a lack of refinery capacity. In 2009, the government decided to build a new refinery, the first in 30 years, in the state of Hidalgo.

    While private investment in natural gas transportation, distribution, and storage is permitted, Pemex remains in sole control of natural gas exploration and production. Despite substantial reserves, Mexico is a net natural gas importer.
    Mexico Economy

    WHY DON'T MEXICO TAKE CARE OF IT'S OWN PEOPLE?
     
  2. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    MEXICO’S NATURAL RESOURCES

    Located atop three tectonic plates (North American, Pacific and Cocos Plates), Mexico is one of the most geologically active regions of Earth. This has resulted in a varied topography, which includes the three Sierra Madre mountain ranges, the Mexican Altiplano and the flat lands around the Yucatan Peninsula. Also, The Tropic of Cancer (23° 26' 22'' N) effectively divides the country into northern temperate and southern subtropical zones.

    Due to its climate, topography and extensive territory (1,972,550 square kilometers or 761,606 square miles, ranked 14th largest worldwide) Mexico is rich in natural resources:

    The mining sector was dominated by hydrocarbons, with some of the world's largest deposits of petroleum (17th) and natural gas (18th). Mexico is also ranked in the top 5 producers of silver (13% of world production), bismuth (20% of the world's total), celestite (7% of world output) and fluorspar (18% of world output); sixth in molybdenum; among the top 10 in barite, bentonite, arsenic, diatomite, graphite, cadmium, gypsum, mine lead, manganese ore, salt, sulfur, and mine zinc; and in the top 15 in mine copper, cement, gold, and crude steel (second largest producer in Latin America).

    With 9,330 kilometers (5,798 miles) of coast along the Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, fishery is very extensive in Mexico with a total catch of 1.02 million tonnes for 2007, accounting for 1.4% of the world's production and ranking at the 17th position.

    Agriculture is another important area. Main crops include corn (ranked 4th worldwide), sorghum (4th), and beans (5th). Mexico is also a major producer and exporter of fruits, vegetables and other agricultural products, being among the top 10 producers of avocado, cacao, coffee, lemon, mango, orange, tomato, sugarcane, honey and banana. Mexico also has the climatic conditions which allow the production and export of cattle, pigs, goats and sheep
     
  3. nraforlife
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    nraforlife Active Member

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    point?
     
  4. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    are you blind, deaf and dumb?
     
  5. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    Me thinks ALL 3!
     
  6. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    the poInt: Mexico is fully capable of taking care of it's own. They don't do it because we do it for them.
    I believe we have more "made in mexico" than any other country.
     
  7. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    Mexico has neither the ablility nor the capability to take care of ANYTHING. Thus the reason we have to do it for them. We are their 'big 'rich' daddy'....and they are our stepchild. They have this false sense of security that the 'el norte' will take care of them thus have never made the effort to do things for themselves. And what has this mentality gotten them?? A miserable, poor, decrepit, crime ridden society.
     

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