Ebonics

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by Borat, Jul 25, 2010.

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  1. Borat
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    Borat BANNED

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    Achtung! : this BE a racist text:

    Does Language Influence Culture? - WSJ.com

    Daaam Yo ! Dat BE mad Rayciss sHEEET !

    How dare WSJ imply that just because ******* can't speak English normally that they are sub-human ?
     
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010
  2. Mad Scientist
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    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    How do you like this "N" word?: Negged.
     
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  3. Baruch Menachem
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    Baruch Menachem '

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    It is not a white/black issue. George Barnard Shaw discussed this in Pygmalion.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owWPgUyK7DY]YouTube - Why cant the english[/ame]
     
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  4. Tank
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    Tank Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. Borat
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    Borat BANNED

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    he wrote it wrong. should say "ME be yo teacha" ...
     
  6. blastoff
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    blastoff Undocumented Reg. User

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    Ebonics = ignorance.
     
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  7. Abishai100
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    Abishai100 VIP Member

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    Populism Popularity


    Ebonics has been studied by many respected scholars and linguists as a historical phenomenon indicative of 'multi-culturalism adaptation.'

    If we look at the meters of early Americas African slave songs and modern day African-American 'Gangster Rap,' we notice that both forms of music exhibit re-orientations of Ebonics phonetics and structure.

    Ebonics is a simplified form of Standard English, expressing a desire to combine economics with lifestyle. An Ebonics speaker will substitute the phonetic syllables 'fi dis' for the standard words 'five discs,' eliminating sounds (glottal and frontal) to achieve efficiency and speed-themed efficiency.

    Let's look at the following recognized African slave song lyrics: "Swing low, sweet chariot....comin' for to carry me home!"

    Now let's look at the following recognized Gangster Rap lyrics: "Yippie-yo, yippie-yay, Death Row's definitely in the house!"

    Both exhibit expressive linguistic shortenings and recombinations --- comin' substituted for coming; yippie-yay substituted for the common euphoria English explicative 'yay!'

    These music lyrics refer to the Ebonics formatting of efficiency or economics expressions as they pertain to the African-American experience. Elation, frustration, impatience, and angst are all part of the message here.

    In order for society to coordinate modern age populism culture (i.e., Facebook, comic book programs, etc.) with academics, we need to understand how lifestyle creates language and informs communication.


    Such notes reveal the surprising value of communication-jargon Hollywood (USA) movies such as "LOL" (2012).





    :arrow:

    LOL 2012 film - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


    bk-poster.jpg
     
  8. Meathead
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    Meathead Gold Member

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    Actually, very good article which does not mention ebonics.
     
  9. Abishai100
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    Abishai100 VIP Member

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    Comparative Diagrams

    In Standard English, the economic use of prepositions signifies the speaker's skill at constructing sentences with communicative fluency.

    Prepositions are structural enhancements and serve as communication hangers for a given constructed sentence such as "I am in love with Mozart."

    It is considered informal and therefore grammatically incorrect to end a sentence in a preposition: "This is the girl I am in love with."

    Language seems to be both simple and complex simultaneously, and our arrangement of words and formatted words (i.e., gerunds, contractions, etc.) reveals society's handling of communication delivery.

    Casual American English speakers sometimes end their sentences with a preposition, since it is not considered to be a moral faux-pas. Why then do we over-scrutinize the syntactical structures of African-American street-pidgin Ebonics?

    Social talk about communication styles can be as intellectually (and politically) valuable as academic analysis of communication deviations.





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    Gangsta rap - Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


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  10. TheOldSchool
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