Dr.King: When people criticize Zionists,they mean Jews,You are talking anti-Semitism!

Discussion in 'Israel and Palestine' started by Roudy, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    :clap2:Dr.King: When people criticize Zionists,they mean Jews,You are talking anti-Semitism! :clap2:

    In a discussion at the home of Marty Peretz in Cambridge, Massachusetts (27 October 1967), as quoted in The Socialism of Fools : The Left, the Jews and Israel by Seymour Martin Lipset in Encounter magazine (December 1969), p. 24; in the anecdotal recounting of the incident Lipset writes:
    One of the young men present happened to make some remark against the Zionists. Dr. King snapped at him and said, "Don't talk like that! When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You're talking anti-Semitism!"

    Further corroboration of Lipset's account of such remarks by King has been made in research done by Martin Kramer posted in "In the words of Martin Luther King…" in his Sandbox (12 March 2012). In this he states that he wrote to Marty Peretz "to ask whether the much-quoted exchange did take place at his Cambridge home on that evening almost 45 years ago. His answer: 'Absolutely'.""
     
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  2. Roudy
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    “When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!”
    —Martin Luther King, Jr.

    King’s words were first reported by Seymour Martin Lipset, at that time the George D. Markham Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard, in an article he published in the magazine Encounter in December 1969—that is, in the year following King’s assassination. Lipset:

    Shortly before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Boston on a fund-raising mission, and I had the good fortune to attend a dinner which was given for him in Cambridge. This was an experience which was at once fascinating and moving: one witnessed Dr. King in action in a way one never got to see in public. He wanted to find what the Negro students at Harvard and other parts of the Boston area were thinking about various issues, and he very subtly cross-examined them for well over an hour and a half. He asked questions, and said very little himself. One of the young men present happened to make some remark against the Zionists. Dr. King snapped at him and said, “Don’t talk like that! When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism!”
     
  3. High_Gravity
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    The Good Doctor nailed it.
     
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  4. Roudy
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    Roudy Platinum Member

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    Thanks, the "Letter to a Zionist Friend" is probably true as well and consistent with Kings views according to historians, but cannot be confirmed.

    The Jewish Theological Seminary -

    "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." — Dr. King
    [​IMG]
    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. links arms with other civil rights leaders, including Abraham Joshua Heschel (second from the right), as they begin a march on March 21, 1965 for voter registration rights for African Americans. Between Dr. Heschel and Dr. King is Dr. Ralphe Bunche, Undersecretary of the United Nations. Courtesy of AP Images.

    [​IMG]
    Chancellor Louis Finkelstein (r) and Professor Joseph Wohl (l) present Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. an honorary degree from JTS in 1964; Dr. Heschel was Dr. King's sponsor. Courtesy of the Ratner Center, JTS.

    [​IMG]
    Dr. Heschel, Rabbi Eli A. Bohnen, and Dr. King at the Rabbinical Assembly convention, two weeks prior to Dr. King's assassination.

    [​IMG]
    Dr. Heschel with JTS rabbinic students in 1972

     
  5. mjollnir
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    So Dr. King was wrong on some things.

    Sort of makes him more human.
     
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    Jews and Blacks have alot of the same enemies, makes sense.
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    King And The Jews — Beyond Heschel

    "If there is one thing that captures popular understanding of the Jewish community’s relationship to the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., it’s an image from Selma, 1965. Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel links arms with a line of activists that include Rev. King, a shoulder’s breadth away, on their historic march to Montgomery. Heschel’s comments afterward have taken on a similarly iconic status: “I felt my feet were praying.”

    But if the role Jews played in King’s civil rights movement is well known — of all whites who participated, between half and two-thirds were Jewish — the full complexity of it remains less understood. As the nation prepares to celebrate Martin Luther King Day this Monday, some scholars suggest that it’s time for a deeper engagement with the issue.

    “Everyone in the Jewish community wants to present its credentials,” said Elliot Ratzman, a professor of religion at Temple University who teaches a course on Judaism and race. “Heschel and King have become the symbol of Jewish activism."

    :clap2:
     
  9. Roudy
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    Black-Jewish Relations in the South

    As far back as the 19th century, Jewish storekeepers were virtually the only Southern merchants who addressed black customers as "Mr." and "Mrs." and permitted them to try on clothing. By the early 20th century, a few Southern Jews even ventured to speak out against the evils of white supremacy. In 1929, Louis Isaac Jaffe, editorial writer for the Norfolk Virginia-Pilot won the Pulitzer Prize for his denunciation of lynching and the reactionary Harry Byrd political machine.

    Julius Rosenwald chairman of Sears Roebuck, contributed more generously in behalf of Southern blacks than did any philanthropist in American history. Rosenwald was Chicagoan, but his munificence was continued by his daughter, Edith Stern of New Orleans, whose Stern Family Fund in later years contributed vast sums to civil rights activities in the South. It was known, too, that Southern Jews privately tended to be more liberal on the race issue than Southern gentiles, and often quietly provided manpower and funds for civil rights causes.

    Individual Heroes

    Jewish participation in the Civil Rights movement far transcended institutional associations. One black leader in Mississippi es*timated that, in the 1960s, the critical decade of the voting-registration drives, "as many as 90 percent of the civil rights lawyers in Missis*sippi were Jewish." Large numbers of them were recent graduates of Ivy League law schools. They worked around the clock analyzing wel*fare standards, the bail system, arrest procedures, justice-of-the-peace rulings. Racing from one Southern town to another, they obtained parade permits and issued complaints on jail beatings and intimida*tion.

    Jews similarly made up at least 30 percent of the white volunteers who rode freedom buses to the South, registered blacks, and picketed segregated establishments. Among them were several dozen Reform rabbis who marched among the demonstrators in Selma and Birming*ham. A number were arrested. Others were taken into custody for attempting to desegregate a swimming pool in St. Augustine, Florida. One of the demonstrating rabbis, Arthur Lelyveld, was severely beaten in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. A young physician, Edward Sachar, vol*unteering his medical services to the freedom marchers, nearly lost his life as his automobile was forced off a Mississippi back road by local rednecks.
     
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    American Jews played a significant role in the founding and funding of some of the most important civil rights organizations, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Nonviolent Coordination Committee (SNCC). In 1909, Henry Moscowitz joined W.E.B. DuBois and other civil rights leaders to found the NAACP. Kivie Kaplan, a vice-chairman of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now the Union for Reform Judaism), served as the national president of the NAACP from 1966 to 1975. Arnie Aronson worked with A. Philip Randolph and Roy Wilkins to found the Leadership Conference.

    From 1910 to 1940, more than 2,000 primary and secondary schools and twenty black colleges (including Howard, Dillard and Fisk universities) were established in whole or in part by contributions from Jewish philanthropist Julius Rosenwald. At the height of the so-called "Rosenwald schools," nearly forty percent of southern blacks were educated at one of these institutions.

    During the Civil Rights Movement, Jewish activists represented a disproportionate number of whites involved in the struggle. Jews made up half of the young people who participated in the Mississippi Freedom Summer in 1964. Leaders of the Reform Movement were arrested with Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in St. Augustine, Florida, in 1964 after a challenge to racial segregation in public accommodations. Most famously, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel marched arm-in-arm with Dr. King in his 1965 March on Selma.


    The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 were drafted in the conference room of Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, under the aegis of the Leadership Conference, which for decades was located in the RAC's building. The Jewish community has continued its support of civil rights laws addressing persistent discrimination in voting, housing and employment against not only women and people of color but also in the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community and the disabled community. Rabbi David Saperstein, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, is currently the only non-African-American member of the NAACP board. :clap2::clap2:

    Religious Action Center - Jews and the Civil Rights Movement
     

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king - when you criticize zionists

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you are talking anti-semitism