Dogtown & Z-boys

Discussion in 'Reviews' started by Dan, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. Dan
    Offline

    Dan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    3,928
    Thanks Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Ratings:
    +157
    If you don't know, this is the documentary that the new movie "Lords of Dogtown" is based on. I guess you really won't have much interest in this if you don't have any interest in skateboarding, but I don't know, maybe you will.

    It's about this small group of friends from the Venice Beach area in the early 70's who basically created skateboarding as we know it today. They were all surfers, but in the afternoon the waves would disappear, so they turned to skateboarding. However, they used their surfing sensibilities on the boards, riding walls, etc., basically doing what we take for granted as being typical skateboard moves for the first time. At the same time, CA had a horrible drought and because all the pools were drained, they skated in the pools, eventually inventing the "aerial" moves that are commonplace in skateboarding today.

    The documentary shows this small group of friends as they gain worldwide fame, some continuing to influence the skating world and some falling to the temptations of drugs, etc.

    It's a really well-done documentary, written and directed by Stacy Peralta, one of the most successful of the original Z-Boys (they were originally sponsored by Zephyr Skateboards). It's neat to see how the entire sport of skateboarding was more or less invented by a bunch of bored teenagers. One of the only setbacks of the film is that pretty much all of the original Z-Boys interviewed seem to realize the importance of their roles in the sport's history, and as such, all seem to come across as very self-congratulatory and occasionally egotistical.

    Still, there's this underlying sense of in your face anti-establishment that's pretty fun and inspiring.
     
  2. Said1
    Offline

    Said1 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    12,087
    Thanks Received:
    937
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Somewhere in Ontario
    Ratings:
    +937

    I really like the documentary too, and didn't find that they came off self-imporant. Too me, they seemed very excited and proud, but not self-important which I found somewhat inspiring.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  3. Dan
    Offline

    Dan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    3,928
    Thanks Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Ratings:
    +157
    Don't get me wrong, I found it very inspiring, as someone who wants to do something that he loves for a living (writing), these types of stories really inspire me.

    But, even Tony Alva himself admits that at one point, he was very egotistical. It wasn't to the point that it ruined the movie or anything, but some humbleness would've been cool. I mean, I understand, they were skate punks from an area that's very localized anyway, so I'm sure a lot of that comes across as egotistical at times, too.

    Still, you hit the nail on the head, it was very inspiring.
     
  4. Said1
    Offline

    Said1 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    12,087
    Thanks Received:
    937
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Somewhere in Ontario
    Ratings:
    +937
    I get your point and it's possible I didn't notice. I'm just surprised at how much I really enjoyed the documentary, I think their enthusiasm made it all the more interesting. Good soundtrack too.
     
  5. Dan
    Offline

    Dan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    3,928
    Thanks Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Ratings:
    +157
    I was just about to say this. Why can't there be good rock music like this anymore?
     
  6. Said1
    Offline

    Said1 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    12,087
    Thanks Received:
    937
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Somewhere in Ontario
    Ratings:
    +937

    I think there is here and there, although nothing compares to Alice Cooper's "Generation Landslide".


    Making soundtracks for movies would be like the ultimate fantasy job for me, I wanted to do that when I was a teenager.
     
  7. Dan
    Offline

    Dan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    3,928
    Thanks Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Ratings:
    +157
    Nearly everything I've written has been inspired in one way or another by music, I would love to be able to compile soundtracks, too.

    Do you enjoy putting together mixed CDs? It's dumb, but I really get a kick out of that, I'm sure my friends are probably sick of getting CDs full of music they'll never listen to though! :D

    Most of today's rock is just so... angry, y'know? Songwriting ability has been replaced by ability to scream the f-word as loud as you can. Don't get me wrong, there's a few good acts out there, but none will ever compare to the classics (Zeppelin, Alice Cooper, Ted Nugent, etc.).
     
  8. Said1
    Offline

    Said1 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    12,087
    Thanks Received:
    937
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Somewhere in Ontario
    Ratings:
    +937
    I have one friend who gives me lists to download and burn, but I basically get on everyone else's nerves. The songs have to be in the right order too, very important! :D


    I think that's the same with most musical genres. I find a lot of hip hop artists are far better song writers these days for some reason, which is puzzling, because I wouldn't normally listen to that type of music. I like just about everything, but have always been partial to blues, jazz and rock. I like old country too, but don't tell anyone. :D
     
  9. Dan
    Offline

    Dan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Messages:
    3,928
    Thanks Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Aiken, SC
    Ratings:
    +157
    Have you ever seen High Fidelity? It really seems like something you'd like, there's a great scene where the main character explains the rules to making a good mixed tape. The first time I saw that movie, I thought the characters were real music nerds/snobs. Then I had a lot of people tell me I reminded them of Jack Black in that movie. :rolleyes:

    I hate pretty much all popular rap, but there are some rappers like Mos Def and Talib Kwalie who are really basically poets with a beat behind them. Check out their album, Black Star, it's amazing.
     
  10. Said1
    Offline

    Said1 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    12,087
    Thanks Received:
    937
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Somewhere in Ontario
    Ratings:
    +937
    I've seen Jack Black discuss his passion for music, I was like that growing up. :eek:

    I'm not a huge fan, but one artist I really like is Atmosphere something about that guy I like for some reason.

    One rock band I really like is Tea Party. Songs like Save Me, The Messenger, Angel and more (I forget for the moment) are really good, decent lyrics. Big Sugar is another good band that has changed their sound over the years. You might like both of them, you might not, still worth looking into IMHO. I'll check out the stuff you mentioned though.
     

Share This Page