Culture wars in the corner drugstore

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Bullypulpit, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Bullypulpit
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    Bullypulpit Senior Member

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    <blockquote><a href=http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0408/p01s02-ussc.html><h2>Culture war hits local pharmacy</h2>
    Many druggists across the country refuse to give out morning-after pills. Legislators weigh in.</a>

    By Amanda Paulson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

    CHICAGO - The culture wars have already seeped into hospices, movie theaters, and the Super Bowl. Now, even the corner drugstore has become a battleground.

    From rural Texas to Chicago, more instances are cropping up of pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions for oral contraceptives and the morning-after pill. As a result, politicians around the country are stepping into the fray.

    It's a debate that weighs personal morals against professional responsibility. It pits religious rights against patients' rights and raises the question of just where pharmacists stand on the spectrum of health-care professionals.

    Many pharmacists point to the "conscience-clause" exceptions that nearly every state has in place for doctors, allowing them to recuse themselves from performing abortions or other procedures they object to. They believe they should have similar protection.

    Critics point out that filling a prescription is a very different job from writing one, and question whether pharmacists can deny a legal drug on moral grounds. And the patients who have been denied are simply angry to see their prescriptions become fodder for a public debate - especially when the prescriptions they wanted filled were for something as time-sensitive as emergency contraceptives, often known as the morning-after pill.</blockquote>

    Refusing to fill a prescription for a legal medication written by an MD or PA is, essentially, practicing medicine without a license. If the pharmacists has qualms about his or her ability to perform the functions of their job based on moral grounds, they need to find another line of work.

    Citations:

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0408/p01s02-ussc.html
     
  2. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    I agree 100%.
     
  3. Shattered
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    I'll be damned.. I agree with Bully 110% on this one. If you're incapable of doing the job for which you were hired, no matter the reason, find another. You have no business in that line of work.

    **scurries off to mark calender**
     
  4. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Guess that would be up tho the boss unless state legislatures step in-- I assume that the pharmacies refusing to fill these perscriptions will be identified and Dr.s will recommend other pharmacies for thier patients to use until the issue is finally resolved.
     
  5. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I actually don't have a problem with this. There are other phramacists. Why should these pharmacists not be allowed to avoid aspects of the job they find morally reprehensible?

    I mean maybe if they had views similar to the JWs who are against all kinds of medical stuff i could understand a problem with it. but i dont see problems with this.
     
  6. Shattered
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    Their job is to fill prescriptions written by doctors. Not judge the worthiness of those prescriptions. They are not medical doctors. They are licensed to count pills, put them in to a bottle, and explain the side effects of said prescriptions. If you're incapable of fulfilling the duties outlined in your job description, it's time to move on to a different job that's more in tune with your own personal standards.

    If I receive a prescription from a doctor, and it's one that I choose to fill (some, I don't bother with, because I know the side effects will alter my capablities for as long as I'm on them - Ex: Cough meds with codeine...), I don't expect to have my doctor second guessed by the person behind the counter in my local drug store. Nor should I have to travel 30 miles to the next drug store, just because someone doesn't "feel up to" doing his job.
     
  7. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    The job of the pharmacist is to do what his boss tells him to do. Blame the company for allowing him to pick and choose.
     
  8. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    Huh? you mean it's okay as long as it goes your way? Oh boy, sounds hypocritical to me.

    If a phamacy does not stock a med. fine, that's their choice. If they do stock a med. then it is the phramacists job to dispense that med. with a valid script from a Doctor, else get another job.
     
  9. Shattered
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    Exactly.
     
  10. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    What if the pharmacist owns the company---are you going to force him to stock items that he doesn't want to?
     

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