Crisis And The Creeping Militarization Of American Society...

Discussion in 'Politics' started by paulitician, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    Great article by Chrostopher J. Coyne & Abigail R. Hall.


    Earlier this month, Congress passed House Resolution 658, the “Federal Aviation Administration Air Transportation Modernization and Safety Improvement Act,” which President Obama is expected to sign. One of the over 1,000 sections of H.R. 658 authorizes domestic use of aerial spy drones by the U.S. government.

    This is but the latest case of the increased militarization of U.S. police forces. Other examples abound. Under Program 1033, the U.S. military provided police with over $500 million in military equipment in 2011, more than double the amount allocated by the government a year before. Small town police forces have been equipped with SWAT gear and automatic weapons. State and local law enforcement are receiving training akin to that expected in the armed forces.

    Such activities fuel an ongoing debate regarding their implication for civil liberties. But H.R. 658 and these other examples also draw attention to a broader point. They lead us to wonder about government constraints, particularly during and after times of crisis.

    The Founding Fathers understood the “paradox of power” — the need to simultaneously empower government and constrain its ability to use that power to violate the rights of citizens. They addressed this paradox by creating checks and balances that would, in principle, constrain the activities of government. One of the most important checks, noted the Founders, were vigilant citizens who monitored the activities of their government.

    But sometimes, citizens are not so careful to check their government. There are instances which work to loosen the restraints on government. One of the greatest threats is the onset of crises. A crisis event induces citizens to call for government to do something and do it quickly. The demand to act swiftly results in an aggressive government response absent public debate and scrutiny. This leads to increases in both the scale and scope of government activities, many of which persist well after the crisis has ended.



    Read more: Crisis and the creeping militarization of American society | The Daily Caller
     
  2. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    boo!
     
  3. paulitician
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    paulitician Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    You should read the article. It concerns you too.
     
  4. Contumacious
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    Contumacious Radical Freedom

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    And what , may I ask, is wrong with that?

    Nazi mass grave

    [​IMG]

    .
     

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