Coronal Mass Ejection detected.

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Photonic, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. Photonic
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    Photonic Ad astra!

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  2. HUGGY
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    HUGGY I Post Because I Care Supporting Member

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  3. Photonic
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    Photonic Ad astra!

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    Hmm?

    That's because so many people are trying to connect to the link right now.

    The graphs show the size.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  4. HUGGY
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    HUGGY I Post Because I Care Supporting Member

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    Does not answer my questions which make all the difference in if we should care.
     
  5. Photonic
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    Photonic Ad astra!

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    I included the graphs because they display both the intensity and size of the ejection.
     
  6. HUGGY
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    HUGGY I Post Because I Care Supporting Member

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    I suspect most if not all here are not astrophysisists. Your graphs mean nothing without something to compare them with and a projected area on our planet that is supposed to get the majority of extra radiation.
     
  7. Photonic
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    Photonic Ad astra!

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    Sorry.

    It is an M-Class CME. It's very big, and it has a very long duration. It will strike our entire magnetic field, possibly causing disturbances in electronics, satellites, and radio wave emissions. You will be able to hear radio stations from other continents because it will reflect off of our atmosphere for a while.
     
  8. HUGGY
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    HUGGY I Post Because I Care Supporting Member

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    Interesting. I've never heard of a flare that lasted 24 hours. The worst ones I know of overloaded electrical transmission lines and caused some blackouts but the regions were like in Nova Scotia and vicinity.. Pretty localized. It takes some hellacious radiation to penetrate the whole Van Allen belt. I guess we will find out regardless because there is nothing we can do about it.
     
  9. Photonic
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    Photonic Ad astra!

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    A long time ago, there was a push to re-work our technology to be resistant to such things as EMR Bursts and geomagnetic disruptions. Unfortunately we never followed through with it. There is radiation shielding on most wires but that is used more for insulation.

    If a large enough CME happens, it could wipe out our entire infrastructure in a matter of moments.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    The Carrington event!

    http://www.leif.org/research/1859 Storm - Extreme Space Weather.pdf

    Abstract. It is generally appreciated that the September 1859 solar–terrestrial disturbance, the first
    recognized space weather event, was exceptionally large. How large and how exceptional? To answer
    these questions, we compiled rank order lists of the various measures of solar-induced disturbance for
    events from 1859 to the present. The parameters considered included: magnetic crochet amplitude,
    solar energetic proton fluence (McCracken et al., 2001a), Sun–Earth disturbance transit time, geomagnetic
    storm intensity, and low-latitude auroral extent. While the 1859 event has close rivals or superiors
    in each of the above categories of space weather activity, it is the only documented event of the last
    ∼150 years that appears at or near the top of all of the lists. Taken together, the top-ranking events in
    each of the disturbance categories comprise a set of benchmarks for extreme space weather activity.
     
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