Coral reefs on the edge of extinction

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Chris, May 29, 2011.

  1. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    Coral reefs around the world could be teetering on the brink of extinction by the end of the century as the oceans become more acidic, scientists have warned.

    New evidence from volcanic seeps - fissures in the ocean floor that leak gases and minerals - suggests a bleak future for the reefs that harbour the world's richest marine ecosystems.

    Three natural carbon dioxide (CO2) seeps in Papua New Guinea have given scientists a snapshot of how coral reefs may look in 100 years.

    Like man-made sources of carbon dioxide, the seeps are making the water around them more acidic.

    The study showed reductions in reef diversity and complexity as pH values fell from 8.1 to 7.8, indicating greater acidity. At values below 7.7, reef development ceased altogether.

    Climate change experts estimate that by the end of the century, ocean acidity worldwide will change in a similar way because of CO2 emissions.

    The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) forecast predicts that rising concentrations of CO2 will reduce worldwide ocean pH from its present level of 8.1 to 7.8.

    Authors of the new research, writing in the journal Nature, said the effect of a pH drop below 7.8 would be "catastrophic" for the coral.

    Coral reefs 'on edge of extinction' -  Environment | MSN News - MSN UK
     
  2. Tank
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    Tank Gold Member

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    Hopfully some thing happens to wipe out a great deal of the human population
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Ocean pH level killing corals...
    :confused:
    Bubbling sea signals severe coral damage this century
    29 May 2011 - Findings from a "natural laboratory" in seas off Papua New Guinea suggest that acidifying oceans will severely hit coral reefs by the end of the century.
     
  4. RWatt
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    RWatt Member

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  5. wirebender
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    wirebender Senior Member

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    Really? The peer reviewed material doesn't seem to agree with you.

    Coral reef calcification and climate change: The effect of ocean warming

    SpringerLink - Marine Biology, Volume 155, Number 2

    Ecosystems: Reef corals bleach to survive change : Abstract : Nature

    ScienceDirect - Marine Environmental Research : Scleractinian coral population size structures and growth rates indicate coral resilience on the fringing reefs of North Jamaica

    Multi-Science Publishing - Journal Article

    ScienceDirect - Marine Pollution Bulletin : Bikini Atoll coral biodiversity resilience five decades after nuclear testing
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Now Bentwire, none of these papers address the problem of acidification on corals. All but two state that after a dieback from thermal stress, what is left of the colony is somewhat resistant to additional thermal stress.

    The second to the last one claims that the studies of the Great Barrier Reef are irrelevant because it is a relitively new reef. And the last addresses the recovery of the Bikini Reef after nuclear testing there.

    So what you have done is brought in a bunch of links that are not related to the problem of acidification. Perhaps you should learn how to read?
     
  7. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    What kind of "scientist" would call a pH of 7.8 acidic..?
    ........ "climate scientists" do ....so now we know they don`t even know what the meaning of "pH" is...
    I knew that they are grand standing dumb fucks, but it never ceases to amaze me how low their level of education is, or that of their following
    Acidity does nor even start unless the pH drops below 7.0 Anything above pH 7 is ALKALINE not acidic
    That alone should tell you what kind of moron "science" that is.
    Also CO2 in Ocean water does not remain as H2CO3...unless you or your "climate scientists" found a yet undiscovered ocean of distilled water, free of Calcium Ions.

    And then this crock of shit...:
    .

    [​IMG]


    Just how did they establish what the "oceanic pH" was 20 million years ago..?

    And then the usual hyper exaggerations...:

    This Hoegh-Guldberg et al garbage science, quoted here seems to have dazzled yet again the likes of "OldRocks" with their "knowledge of buzz word science" by pasting a wikipedia definition pH=-log[H+]l

    And then this garbage about the "30% change in the hydrogen ion concentration"...

    For fucks sake, there is no Chemist or real scientist that would sensationalize a change 8 places behind the decimal point
    0.000000079 and that is in grams per liter, or ppt.
    So the final numbers we are looking at is a difference between 0.0000000000079 and 0.000000000015...eleven places behind the decimal point...



    So we are looking at a difference or a "change" 14 fucking places behind the decimal point and you figure this will wipe out coral reefs...?


    LESS ALKALINE would have been the correct scientific terminology, but the OCEANS ARE BECOMING MORE ACIDIC...

    That`s fucking typical fodder for CO2 "climate change" morons



    Seems to me that you alarmists weirdos like "OldRocks" and thunderfarts.. have nothing better to do than sit there all day every day, scavenging the internet for ridiculous trash like this, 22 | December | 2007 | Climate Changecorals-in-peril/"

    [​IMG]


    I don`t care what kind of garbage "information" you guys read, but what makes you think that others should read the same crap you read...?
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2011
  8. wirebender
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    wirebender Senior Member

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    I would point out to you that the oceans are not in the least acidic, but polar bear has already said it all. There is no acidification problem; none at all. Your hand wringing hysterics are not based in anything like real science.
     
  9. Douger
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    Douger BANNED

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    Good points.
    So tell us Bear. What is the optimal PH for keeping corals in a tank ?
    What is the average PH off of Ambergris Key ?
    What can a person do to raise or lower the PH as needed ?
    Do corals have any affect on the PH levels of the worlds oceans ?
    Can plankton thrive in a sea where the PH leans toward basicity ?
    (Douger hears Canuk removing mittens and Googling basicity)
    OMG ! It cant be a word !!! Spell check caught it ! OMG !
    BTW. I know all of the answers to the questions I asked.

    Tell me. How long ago did you move to Canada from murka ?
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Well for sure we know that you will read nothing useful, BiPolar.

    Foraminiferal boron isotope ratios as a proxy for surface ocean pH over the past 21 Myr

    Foraminiferal boron isotope ratios as a proxy for surface ocean pH over the past 21 Myr


    Arthur J. Spivack, Chen-Feng You & H. Jesse Smith


    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Oilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA


    THE pH of the surface ocean is a sensitive function of its alkalinity and total inorganic carbon concentration, properties which also control the partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide17. Thus, an accurate proxy for past ocean pH could yield information about variations in atmospheric CO2. Recently, it has been suggested that the boron isotopic composition of foraminiferal tests depends on the pH of sea water as well as its isotopic composition1,2. Here we present boron isotope and elemental data for sedimentary pore fluids and isotope data for bulk foraminiferal samples from a deep-sea sediment core. The composition of the pore waters implies that sea water boron concentrations and isotopic composition have been constant during the past 21 Myr, allowing us to reconstruct past ocean pH directly from the foraminiferal isotope data. We find that 21 Myr ago, surface ocean pH was only 7.4 0.2, but it then increased to 8.2 0.2 (roughly the present value) about 7.5 Myr ago. This is consistent with suggestions3–5 that atmospheric CO2 concentrations may have been much higher 21 Myr ago than today.
     

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