Colorado: Raise taxes? Hell No!

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Ame®icano, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. Ame®icano
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    Ame®icano Gold Member

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    Colorado voters adamantly refuse to raise taxes to fund public schools

    So, every time schools cry for more money, they get it. Throwing more money should bring some results, right? Well, voters decided... enough is enough. They voted NO with 2-1 margin. Nice.
     
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  2. Teals_Of_Wonder
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    Teals_Of_Wonder BANNED

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    Is this a Democrats Proposal?
     
  3. Ame®icano
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    Ame®icano Gold Member

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  4. Care4all
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    Care4all Warrior Princess Supporting Member

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    so you say they throw money at schools while the article says they've faced years of budget cuts?

    so, which is it?
     
  5. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    Colorado has been anti-tax for quite a few years now, and any statewide tax increase must be approved directly by the voters. The problem is that many people do not understand how much of school funding has been cut in many districts. This is happening pretty much nationwide. Last fall, we had a school levy on the ballot. It was defeated. Following it's defeat, the school district laid off approximately 10% of all the teachers. They also added on substantial fees for sports and all extra-curricular activities. Now all sports cost $150 per sport with a $450 yearly maximum per family. In the past it was $125 for the entire year, regardless of the number of sports. The fee for sports is not really that big of an issue, but in poorer communities it would be. The big issue was with the cut in teachers as class sizes have now swelled to an average of 26 to 28 students per class at all levels.

    So, after making all the cuts, the school board put another identical levy on the ballot in the spring. It passed by a 2 to 1 margin after everyone realized how bad all the cuts were. The problem is that the new levy can't undo many of the cuts. The money was needed six months earlier, so now the levy that was passed is just enough to keep us where we are. The teachers even took pay cuts to try to keep them from having to make more cuts.

    The big problem with the Colorado cut is that it will hurt the poorer school districts much more than everyone else. Voters in those districts just don't have the money to pass increased levies on themselves. Districts like Cherry Creek Schools can get the additional money from within their own district. However, districts such as Denver Public will not be so fortunate, so kids in the poorer school systems will suffer the most.
     
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  6. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    Schools nationwide are in dire straits because they have lost a great deal of revenue due to decreasing property values and state budget shortfalls. In most cases, these school districts are not looking for more money, they are looking to find money that they used to have and that is no longer there. Some cuts can be made, but you eventually get to a point where you begin to really gut the system. This is not a good thing.
     
  7. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Diamond Member

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    The article was written by a liberal Democrat, obviously
     
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  8. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    If money makes no difference to educational outcomes then why do the rich send all their kids to those elite prep schools that cost so much money?
     
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  9. old navy
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    old navy <<< Action Figures

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    The district in which I teach is in one of the wealthiest counties in the U.S. I just work there; don't live there. Anyway, we have gone through the budget cuts, de-staffing, no pay raises for two years, increased user fees for sports and testing, and whatnot.

    It has been my observation that the more diverse and lower SES schools get more money from several sources. For example, the sports fee is waived if the student is on free or reduced lunches. Same for IB and AP testing. A school with more "poor" kids is also eligible for more grants from various subject areas from both government and private sector entities.

    My school is one of the lowest performing in the district yet we rank in the top six percent of all schools in the country. Our expenditure per pupil is lower than some districts and higher than others. We probably spend more per student than many private schools. The reasons of course are higher teacher salaries and top-notch facilities. The district attracts the best teachers but one of the biggest reasons for the high achievement of the students is that they are high achievers to start with. They have great two parent support, nice cars and clothes, and lots of big-wig oversight. Not only do most of the parents know the law, many of them write the laws of the nation.

    All that is the district as a whole. My school is the most diverse with the largest number of free lunches eaten daily. Since I teach in CTE, most of my students are the NOT SO well-to-do ones. And I like it like that. Helping a kid get into college or other post high school training is more rewarding if that kid would not have otherwise had the guidance. As far as the subject of the OP, I just make do with what I have and make the best of it, regardless of the tax rate. And that is a good life lesson to the kids as well.
     
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  10. LordBrownTrout
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    LordBrownTrout Gold Member

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    With the public education bar sitting as low as it is, it would be hard for a virus to pass under. Public education is sub-mediocre at best. We should demand excellence but instead we have government.
     

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