CO2 is a very good thing

Discussion in 'Environment' started by bigrebnc1775, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. bigrebnc1775
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    bigrebnc1775 Diamond Member

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    Watch and learn warmers

    From the video
    Isolated for 42 days in chambers of ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations, we periodically document the growth of cowpea plants (Vigna unguiculata) via time-lapse photography.
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2qVNK6zFgE&feature=recentf]YouTube - Seeing is Believing[/ame]
     
  2. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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    Plants like CO2 and warm temperatures. Just like the earth had in previous times (that were often called xxxx Optimum). But this time it is bad, just ask them.
     
  3. bigrebnc1775
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    bigrebnc1775 Diamond Member

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    It seems like a lot of concentrated CO2 grew a bigger plant to me.
     
  4. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    God you guys are dumb.

    Further evidence why right wingers and science don't mix.

    Find out how added CO2 "improves" the nutritious value of said "plants".

    You might as well be eating "cardboard".:lol::eusa_clap::lol:
     
  5. bigrebnc1775
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    bigrebnc1775 Diamond Member

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    So tell us deano what makes a plant grow?
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    So tell me, dumbass, what part of nutrition within said plant did you not understand. And not all plants react with faster growth. In fact, when other factors are added, the additional CO2 may suppress growth.

    Climate Change Surprise: High Carbon Dioxide Levels Can Retard Plant Growth, Study Reveals

    But results from the third year of the experiment revealed a more complex scenario. While treatments involving increased temperature, nitrogen deposition or precipitation – alone or in combination – promoted plant growth, the addition of elevated CO2 consistently dampened those increases.

    "The three-factor combination of increased temperature, precipitation and nitrogen deposition produced the largest stimulation [an 84 percent increase], but adding CO2 reduced this to 40 percent," Shaw and her colleagues wrote.

    The mean net plant growth for all treatment combinations with elevated CO2 was about 4.9 tons per acre – compared to roughly 5.5 tons per acre for all treatment combinations in which CO2 levels were kept normal. However, when higher amounts of CO2 gas were added to plots with normal temperature, moisture and nitrogen levels, aboveground plant growth increased by nearly a third.
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Increased CO2 Levels Are Mixed Blessing For Agriculture

    If you’re looking for a positive spin on rising CO2 levels, it’s that agricultural production in some areas is bound to increase,” Curtis said. “Crops have higher yields when more CO2 is available, even if growing conditions aren’t perfect.

    “But there’s a tradeoff between quantity and quality. While crops may be more productive, the resulting produce will be of lower nutritional quality
     
  8. IanC
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    IanC Gold Member

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  9. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Climate myths: Higher CO2 levels will boost plant growth and food production - environment - 16 May 2007 - New Scientist

    Limiting factors
    However, while experiments on natural ecosystems have also found initial elevations in the rate of plant growth, these have tended to level off within a few years. In most cases this has been found to be the result of some other limiting factor, such as the availability of nitrogen or water.

    The regional climate changes that higher CO2 will bring, and their effect on these limiting factors on plant growth, such as water, also have to be taken into account. These indirect effects are likely to have a much larger impact than CO2 fertilisation.

    For instance, while higher temperatures will boost plant growth in cooler regions, in the tropics they may actually impede growth. A two-decade study of rainforest plots in Panama and Malaysia recently concluded that local temperature rises of more than 1ÂșC have reduced tree growth by 50 per cent (see Don't count on the trees).

    Another complicating factor is ground level ozone due to air pollution, which damages plants. This is expected to rise in many regions over the coming decades and could reduce or even negate the beneficial effects of higher CO2 (see Climate change warning over food production).

    In the oceans, increased CO2 is causing acidification of water. Recent research has shown that the expected doubling of CO2 concentrations could inhibit the development of some calcium-shelled organisms, including phytoplankton, which are at the base of a large and complex marine ecosystem (see Ocean acidification: the other CO2 problem). That may also result in significant loss of biodiversity, possibly including important food species.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    It should be noted that just the increase of CO2 will not be that great a boon. Without other factors also being present, in some cases, and for certain food crops, the increase in CO2 could lead to a decrease in the amount of crop yeild and also a decrease in nutritional value.
     

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