Chipping away at privacy with radio waves

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by NewGuy, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. NewGuy
    Online

    NewGuy Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/04/14/rfid/

    BOHICA:

    Bend Over Here It Comes Again.
     
  2. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    This will be the boom and bomb when it comes to new business. People will rebel at the privacy aspects of this and will look for products without this technology. I know if it happens, I'll be starting my own manufacturing business. :thup:
     
  3. NewGuy
    Online

    NewGuy Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Well, I don't see you having any viable way out when you wont be able to purchase anything that DOESN'T have these tags. Remember the DOD was the originator of these. I am sure there will be a mandate for "security purposes". The American people seem to be oriented toward giving up privacy for security --even if it has to be done like a boiled frog approach.
     
  4. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    what purchasing? I'm talking about manufacturing. make the same products WITHOUT the chips, people will buy.

    as far as a mandate to have them.....I personally don't see it happening (though they may actually try it) but I think it will sour tremendously from the people.
     
  5. NewGuy
    Online

    NewGuy Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    You can manufacture, but how?

    You need tools, materials, etc. You will still buy clothes, food, shelter and such.

    Also, if you use credit, the cards have the IDs. Pay an employee? You are using cheques right? -Chips in those, your bank cards, etc.

    It is really a pervasive thing.

    Remember, many cards and products have been using this for a year or more.
     
  6. 5stringJeff
    Offline

    5stringJeff Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,990
    Thanks Received:
    536
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Puyallup, WA
    Ratings:
    +540
    The military has been using this stuff for years. It's how we track containers.
     
  7. JeffGuidry
    Online

    JeffGuidry Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Hello. This is my first post.

    I've read and thought a bit about RFID. It seems that these tiny transmitters couldn't possibly have a very long range to send or receive RF (max 10-20 yards). Even if you could drive down a street and send out signals, how could you be sure which house the signal was coming from? Of course, that lets you gather lots of information about a particular neighborhood, but individual privacy in this instance doesn't seem to be threatened. Plus, how long would the power source for items like these last? Just enough juice to send out a signal when commanded, and enough in reserve for natural drain for the anticipated length of time the item would sit on a shelf. Likely these RFID's would not be able to send out multiple signals, and even if they did the window of opportunity would be pretty short (a few days?).

    I've thought of a novel use for RFID's to make safer landmines. An RFID could be inserted into a landmine, and would respond to a complex RF code that would be difficult for the enemy to discover. At the end of hostilies in an area, an RF transmitter near the landmine could send out this code, and the RFID could begin transmitting its location. Using triangulation, a mine clearing team could pinpoint the location of a mine and dig it up or explode it in place, thereby dramatically reducing the amount of UXO after a war.

    The main limitation of this idea is battery power, discovering a battery (likely lithium) that could keep an adequate charge for a decade or more. But if the RFID system reduced the UXO after wars to near zero, it would be worth it, and the US could take signifigantly less crap from the 'international community' about anti-personnel mines.
     
  8. Bullypulpit
    Offline

    Bullypulpit Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    Messages:
    5,849
    Thanks Received:
    378
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Ratings:
    +379
    ...The RFID tags don't need a battery. THey'll resonate to a specific radio frequency. Although for the UXO application they would need a battery. The range is approximately 300 feet.

    Scenario: You're walking down the street, and every store window, every kiosk greets you by name and exhorts you to buy more of the product you're wearing. Extrapolate that to traking your every move...Who needs a universal ID card then. Just tap into the internet and voila you're location is pinpointed to the nearest millimeter. Ever see "<i>The Minority Report</i>"?
     
  9. rtwngAvngr
    Offline

    rtwngAvngr Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    15,755
    Thanks Received:
    511
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +511
    I don't care if corporations know what products I use.
    It's research to serve me better.

    Again, we should focused not on disclosures of information but what is made illegal.
     
  10. rtwngAvngr
    Offline

    rtwngAvngr Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    15,755
    Thanks Received:
    511
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +511
    Ok. Let's say they use this this chip to figure out your race. Is it then ok to use your race information to discriminate against you?
     

Share This Page