Cheney Criticizes Kerry on Security Issue

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  1. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=694&u=/ap/20040426/ap_on_el_pr/kerry_cheney_6&printer=1

    Cheney Criticizes Kerry on Security Issue
    16 minutes ago


    By RON FOURNIER, AP Political Writer

    FULTON, Mo. - Vice President Dick Cheney (news - web sites) said Monday that John Kerry (news - web sites) "has given us ample grounds to doubt" his judgment on national security even as the Democratic National Committee (news - web sites) chairman urged the White House to stop such attacks.


    AP Photo

    Reuters

    Slideshow: Elections


    Latest headlines:
    · Cheney Criticizes Kerry on Security Issue
    AP - 16 minutes ago
    · Kerry: Bush Failed to Enforce Trade Pacts
    AP - 40 minutes ago
    · Vietnam becomes political battlefield for Kerry
    AFP - 45 minutes ago

    _

    "Call off the Republican attack dogs," DNC Chairman Terry McAuliffe told reporters in Washington. Half a country away, Cheney told a friendly crowd at Westminster College that Kerry wavered in views to oust Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein (news - web sites) as well as the strength of the Persian Gulf war coalition built by President Bush (news - web sites)'s father.


    The vice president dug up several quotes in which Kerry supported the removal of Saddam Hussein and praised the effort of the first Bush president. The vice president also criticized Kerry for supporting military budget and intelligence cuts during his four terms as Massachusetts senator.


    "In his years in Washington, Senator Kerry has been one vote of 100 in the U.S. Senate and fortunately on matters of national security, he was often the minority. But the president always casts the deciding vote and the senator from Massachusetts has given us ample grounds to doubt the judgment and the attitude he brings to bear on vital issues of national security."


    Cheney's speech coincides with a $10 million television advertising spree by Bush's re-election campaign, starting this week, that seeks to portray Kerry as weak on national security. Other Bush ads have questioned the Massachusetts senator's fitness for the presidency because he voted against a $87 billion funding measure for U.S. troops in Iraq (news - web sites). Bush, Kerry has said, threatened to veto the bill.


    "George Bush has sent Dick Cheney to kick off a misleading ad campaign attacking John Kerry's commitments to defending America. And Dick Cheney is still able to stand by with a straight face and watch these attacks unfold," McAuliffe said during a news conference.


    "The American people have better things to do with their time than listen to more misleading attacks from a man who has been misleading them from the day he took office," McAuliffe said.


    A spokesman for the Bush-Cheney campaign, Steve Schmidt, responded that McAuliffe has "a staggering lack of credibility" on the issue.


    "During the height of the Cold War John Kerry advocated canceling the critical weapons systems that helped win the Cold War and are still being used to win the war on terror," Schmidt said. "After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Vice President Cheney helped transform the military from the Cold War era to the 21st century military that serves America today."


    In a preview of his news conference, McAuliffe said Sunday that Cheney has "zero credibility" when it comes to criticizing Kerry's national security credentials. Cheney as secretary of defense had proposed cuts to weapons programs being used by U.S. troops in Iraq, McAuliffe said.


    Cheney, who was defense secretary from 1989-1992, "tried to kill" more than 81 weapons programs, including M-1 tanks, Apache helicopters, F-16 fighter planes and B-2 bombers, McAuliffe said. He also pushed for closing more than 70 domestic military installations, and reducing the size of the military by 500,000 active duty personnel and 200,000 reservists, McAuliffe said.


    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case seeking to force the disclosure of members of Cheney's energy task force. Bush and Cheney testify together and in private Thursday before the independent commission investigating the Sept. 11 terrorists attacks.


    Saturday marks the first anniversary of Bush's visit to the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln, where, under a giant banner proclaiming "Mission Accomplished," he declared the end of major combat in Iraq. Most of the more than 700 U.S. troops killed in Iraq lost their lives after Bush's May 1, 2003, declaration. Cheney Criticizes Kerry on Security Issue
    16 minutes ago


    By RON FOURNIER, AP Political Writer

    FULTON, Mo. - Vice President Dick Cheney (news - web sites) said Monday that John Kerry (news - web sites) "has given us ample grounds to doubt" his judgment on national security even as the Democratic National Committee (news - web sites) chairman urged the White House to stop such attacks.


    AP Photo

    Reuters

    Slideshow: Elections


    Latest headlines:
    · Cheney Criticizes Kerry on Security Issue
    AP - 16 minutes ago
    · Kerry: Bush Failed to Enforce Trade Pacts
    AP - 40 minutes ago
    · Vietnam becomes political battlefield for Kerry
    AFP - 45 minutes ago

    _

    "Call off the Republican attack dogs," DNC Chairman Terry McAuliffe told reporters in Washington. Half a country away, Cheney told a friendly crowd at Westminster College that Kerry wavered in views to oust Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein (news - web sites) as well as the strength of the Persian Gulf war coalition built by President Bush (news - web sites)'s father.


    The vice president dug up several quotes in which Kerry supported the removal of Saddam Hussein and praised the effort of the first Bush president. The vice president also criticized Kerry for supporting military budget and intelligence cuts during his four terms as Massachusetts senator.


    "In his years in Washington, Senator Kerry has been one vote of 100 in the U.S. Senate and fortunately on matters of national security, he was often the minority. But the president always casts the deciding vote and the senator from Massachusetts has given us ample grounds to doubt the judgment and the attitude he brings to bear on vital issues of national security."


    Cheney's speech coincides with a $10 million television advertising spree by Bush's re-election campaign, starting this week, that seeks to portray Kerry as weak on national security. Other Bush ads have questioned the Massachusetts senator's fitness for the presidency because he voted against a $87 billion funding measure for U.S. troops in Iraq (news - web sites). Bush, Kerry has said, threatened to veto the bill.


    "George Bush has sent Dick Cheney to kick off a misleading ad campaign attacking John Kerry's commitments to defending America. And Dick Cheney is still able to stand by with a straight face and watch these attacks unfold," McAuliffe said during a news conference.


    "The American people have better things to do with their time than listen to more misleading attacks from a man who has been misleading them from the day he took office," McAuliffe said.


    A spokesman for the Bush-Cheney campaign, Steve Schmidt, responded that McAuliffe has "a staggering lack of credibility" on the issue.


    "During the height of the Cold War John Kerry advocated canceling the critical weapons systems that helped win the Cold War and are still being used to win the war on terror," Schmidt said. "After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Vice President Cheney helped transform the military from the Cold War era to the 21st century military that serves America today."


    In a preview of his news conference, McAuliffe said Sunday that Cheney has "zero credibility" when it comes to criticizing Kerry's national security credentials. Cheney as secretary of defense had proposed cuts to weapons programs being used by U.S. troops in Iraq, McAuliffe said.


    Cheney, who was defense secretary from 1989-1992, "tried to kill" more than 81 weapons programs, including M-1 tanks, Apache helicopters, F-16 fighter planes and B-2 bombers, McAuliffe said. He also pushed for closing more than 70 domestic military installations, and reducing the size of the military by 500,000 active duty personnel and 200,000 reservists, McAuliffe said.


    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case seeking to force the disclosure of members of Cheney's energy task force. Bush and Cheney testify together and in private Thursday before the independent commission investigating the Sept. 11 terrorists attacks.


    Saturday marks the first anniversary of Bush's visit to the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln, where, under a giant banner proclaiming "Mission Accomplished," he declared the end of major combat in Iraq. Most of the more than 700 U.S. troops killed in Iraq lost their lives after Bush's May 1, 2003, declaration.
     
  2. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    How many times can MaCauliffe call Cheney a liar and say that he's misleading the American people since hes been in office? I counted at least 15 in that article alone. And it wasnt even about Terry MaCauliffe.
     
  3. JIHADTHIS
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    JIHADTHIS Active Member

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    If you saw the speech, Cheney made Kerry look like a rented mule....:laugh:
     
  4. acludem
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    acludem VIP Member

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    Actually, I live near Fulton and the folks at Westminster were absolutely lied to by Cheney. He was told not to make a campaign speech and he did so anyway. The President of the College was absolutely furious, and he's a Republican btw, so don't give me some crap out he's some liberal college person.

    John Kerry is speaking at Westminster tomorrow; they invited him in the interest of fairness. My guess is Kerry may respond some to Cheney, but mostly he'll just talk about his own plans. Here's a link with more info: http://www.showmenews.com/2004/Apr/20040428News005.asp

    acludem
     

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