Cheaper More Efficient Nanotech Electrocatalyst

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by JimBowie1958, May 14, 2012.

  1. JimBowie1958
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    JimBowie1958 Old Fogey

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    http://phys.org/news/2012-05-nanosheet-catalyst-sustainably-hydrogen.htm
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    Nanotech is changing and improving our lives in ways no one even imagined ten years ago. The future is bright for humanity if we can just not kill each other off.
     
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  2. Big Fitz
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    Nanotech is THE big advance in materials science. It will be on par with discovering Electricity or Germ Theory with how it is going to change our lives. It's too bad the biggest changes most likely will happen after we are gone (well at least me).
     
  3. whitehall
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    whitehall Gold Member

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    The first thing you gotta understand is that things aren't always what they seem. Brookhaven isn't the warm and fuzzy laboratory dedicated to the good of mankind. Brookhaven used to be the Atomic Energy Commission and it was taken over by the Dept.of Energy. Later the DOE subcontracted it to "University Associates" which was convicted of leaking radioactive material into the N.J. Pine Barons. UA was reorganized under the name of "Brookhaven Science Associates LLC" which is currently affiliated with Stony Brook University and an Ohio non profit entity called Battelle Memorial Inc. The point is that Brookhaven is another gigantic university grant (or worse) combined with unidentified "non-profit" entity which will furnish evidence of any dream you want to hear as long as the taxpayer grants keep coming.
     
  4. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    The future is bright as long as blacks or islam don't destroy civilization first that is. This is very cool, so I will be fighting for civilization!
     
  5. JimBowie1958
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    JimBowie1958 Old Fogey

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    Dont be so pessimistic, Fitz. Technology is moving at an exponentially increasing pace. This is due to the speed with which scientists can communicate with each other, the vast number of trained minds that are available to analyze plausible applications of new tech with old problems and increasingly newer ones as well, and the aid of computer resolution to enormously complex theories and analysis. This will explodeonce they start using gamers to solve problems more. The collective minds of those who love to solve puzzles is the last virtual untapped resource we still have available.

    I think most of us here will, God Willing, see a technological utopia, where a person need only work for satisfaction as all commodities will be so cheap that even the poorest can afford them.

    It will be to some extent, what a great number of our best minds of our civilization have worked toward for the last five centuries. We will get there if we dont fuck it all up just minutes before the dawn with old hatreds and greed.
     
  6. Big Fitz
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    Not pessimistic, just realistic. Advances like this take between 20-50 years to make it solidly into the public venue as products depending on complications. I still don't have my flying car... for example.
     
  7. JimBowie1958
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    JimBowie1958 Old Fogey

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    What used to take 20-50 years, now takes about 5 - 10 years. For example, it used to take several years to set up a factory, hire all the workers, design the process, etc. Now people can do that with microfactories in a few months. Everything moves so much faster today because of the ease of communication, the availability of global markets for resources and the computerization of everything.

    Why not?

    They have been around awhile.

    Top five flying cars and the technology behind them

    Its just that not enough of us see a need for them to buy them and psh the prices down to something the everyday person can afford.

    As our suburbs have grown and commutes get longer, the need for such vehicles increases the demand and will make them affordable.

    Technological inovation requires need in the markeet as well as the technological capability for something to become widespread.
     
  8. Big Fitz
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    Yes, things move faster for development, that is true... in SOME fields, not all. Computerization has gone a long way. But look how long it has taken for many other advances we do have. For instance, we are a long way from DARPAnet when the Internet concept was first developed in the late 1940's and early 50's. The personal computer took 40 years to develop from when they were originally used to compute bomb and shell trajectories. How about Solar Cells? We are not THAT much improved over when they were first rolled out in the 1970's. Sure refinements and miniaturization took hold, but it's still not there.

    Refinement takes time from lab experiment to prototype to first generation to third generation. That is what I'm referring to. Sure, some things will be out rather quickly in limited and primative functionality. That's a given. But as for the refined product? No. 20-50 years is not that far fetched.

    In the end, also, all new technology faces the same hurdles as every one before it. Is it 'bigger, better, faster, cheaper..."? Does it look cool? Do I really need it? And of course, if you don't think this matters, look at all those countertop home appliances that link back to Ronco and George Foreman. The path to the future is fraught with dead ends, bad choices, bad luck and just plain weirdness.
     
  9. JimBowie1958
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    JimBowie1958 Old Fogey

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    It took computers 49 years to go from an expensive tool that only the government could afford and were delicately maintained, to being so ubiquitous and reliable that kids today cant imagine a world without them.

    In contrast, black powder took over a millenia to go from useless diversion, to a weaponized form that only kings and emporers could afford it, to a form that the local town blacksmith could make the weapons that used black powder, to today where the form is so well worn and known that no one thinks about all the precision they behold when they look at a 308 round.

    The cycle from toy, to central state tool, to local production to ubiquitousness has been shortened by a factor of 50.

    And consider the same cycle for mail, telegraph, railroads, steam power, radio, television and motion picture technology. Over time these thing are moving faster and faster.

    The problem with solar panels has little to do with the panels themselves but on how to adequately store and then use that power during appropriate times.


    I agree with most of that, but I think the cycle is much shorter for future developments than the cycle has been for computers. I suspect that nanotech will be ubiquitous by 2030, and the refinement process will continue aftwerwards but I dont think refinement is a process that ever truly ends.


    True, but these things will be the dead ends, etc, because there will be even better alternative or we just dont have a need for that capability yet. The lag in adoption is not solely due to the slowness of the tech development alone.
     
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  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Now Mathew, in 1962, both sides were white. And the Christians failed to destroy the world in the Crusades. If you want a candidate to destroy the world as we know it, greed is the best candidate, irregardless of color.
     

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