Caring For One Of Our Own?

Discussion in 'Military' started by rayboyusmc, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. rayboyusmc
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    rayboyusmc Senior Member

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    tp://tinyurl.com/2r282a
     
  2. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    So the shrink didn't back down and bucked up. Good for him. The military eats its own. I know that, you know that, and every vet on this board knows that.

    Most officers I knew would have cowered at being questioned and taken the hint to go quietly back to their holes. I have to wonder would this doctor have done the same for an enlisted man.

    Actually, no I don't. I saw too many good Marines get hung out to dry by the chair-polishing weasels and few (and yes there are/were those few) that were willing to risk a few marks down on the all-important fitrep.

    That is the ugly side of the military, but anyone who has served has seen it.

    Oh, and rayboyUSMC, to clarify: having not served with you that I am aware of and not knowing you personally, my comments are not directed at you personally.
     
  3. 82Marine89
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    82Marine89 Member

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    Kudos to the Colonel. :clap2:
     
  4. rayboyusmc
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    rayboyusmc Senior Member

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    The majority of Marine Officers that I served with would have stood up for their troops.

    The problem with our system is that to get to the top, 0-6 and on, you may have to kiss a lot of ass just like Colonel Hackworth used to write about. There are a lot of his "perfumed princes" who infect the Pentagon like cockaroaches feeding off the crumbs of their senior officers.

    I don't think this is a hell of a lot different than the civilian sector that I have worked in for almost 20 years since I retired. Unless you have real leaders at the top, shit will often rise above the cream.

    Next to Smedley Butler, you might want to read up on LtCol Evans Carlson. He was a real leader who valued his men and accomplished the mission. Highest kill ratio and lowest casualty ratio. WW II First Raider Battalion.

    Too many weasels make it to the top because organizations reward the wrong behaviors.
     
  5. maineman
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    maineman BANNED

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    I agree completely!
     
  6. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Evans Carlson was also a bigtime socialist.

    When did you retire, might I ask? The Corps changed drastically from the time I enlisted to the time I retired.
     
  7. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Platinum Member

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    Yup by the mid 90's when I retired there was a whole crop of officers that had been taught that there was no room for any failure or mistakes at all.
     
  8. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    Yeah, the called it the "zero defect mentality" and told us we were supposed to not do it. When I joined, you could screw up, pay the piper and it was forgotten. If you screwed up by the mid-90s you might as well start hitting jobsearch on google.

    Yet they couldn't figure out why no wanted to hang it out on a limb and do a b billet.
     
  9. rayboyusmc
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    rayboyusmc Senior Member

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    Retired in 88. I didn't see a lot of change in the Corps culture when I was in.

    I completely enjoyed my tour. I was just ready to move on to other things, didn't want to go back to Washington or Okinawa, the promotions had slowed down completely and Florida was a good place to retire then.

    I think today the military is a whole different kettle of fish. Not sure what exactly it is, but it is different.
     
  10. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    It's very different. I enjoyed my tour as well, and did not mean to give any other impression. Like you, it was just time for me to move on. Part of that decision was made based on the fact the Corps I retired from was not the Corps I had joined. Sometimes for better, sometimes for the worse.

    One of the reasons I JOINED was to get the Hell away from Miami though and retiring there had NO appeal for me.
     

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