Cain endorses a health reform plan

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Greenbeard, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    In one of the few policy surprises (health care related or otherwise) in last night's debate, Herman Cain did something none of the other candidates have done, as far as I know: he endorsed a full-fledged health reform plan.

    Cain went back to a proposal introduced in the last Congress in 2009: the Empowering Patients First Act (H.R. 3400 in that Congress). This was the Republican Study Committee's suggested package of health reforms.

    Here's the Congressional Research Service summary of its major provisions with a few additional comments from me in blue.

    Kudos to Cain on hitching his wagon to an actual fleshed-out proposal. Of all the health care proposals the Republicans put forth in the previous Congress, this one isn't my favorite but at least it's a place to begin a conversation.
     
  2. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    I should probably also note that this isn't just pining for a defunct bill: the Empowering Patients First Act has been re-introduced in the current Congress as H.R. 3000. It seems to be exactly the same, except of course now it repeals most of the Affordable Care Act. At the moment it only has 16 co-sponsors, however, vs. 54 in the previous Congress. But now it has the endorsement of a presidential candidate.
     
  3. jgarden
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    jgarden Senior Member

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    The Republicans had 8 years in the White House (6 of which had GOP majorities in both the House and the Senate) to demonstrate that the private sector could provide Americans with a comprehensive, affordable healthcare system.

    What stopped them?
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011

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