bush admin to reclassify fast food jobs???

Discussion in 'Politics' started by DKSuddeth, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    anyone hear about any of this in the economic report?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/20/business/20jobs.html?pagewanted=print&position=

    In the New Economics: Fast-Food Factories?
    By DAVID CAY JOHNSTON

    s cooking a hamburger patty and inserting the meat, lettuce and ketchup inside a bun a manufacturing job, like assembling automobiles?

    That question is posed in the new Economic Report of the President, a thick annual compendium of observations and statistics on the health of the United States economy.

    The latest edition, sent to Congress last week, questions whether fast-food restaurants should continue to be counted as part of the service sector or should be reclassified as manufacturers. No answers were offered.

    In a speech to Washington economists Tuesday, N. Gregory Mankiw, chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers, said that properly classifying such workers was "an important consideration" in setting economic policy.

    Counting jobs at McDonald's, Burger King and other fast-food enterprises alongside those at industrial companies like General Motors and Eastman Kodak might seem like a stretch, akin to classifying ketchup in school lunches as a vegetable, as was briefly the case in a 1981 federal regulatory proposal.

    But the presidential report points out that the current system for classifying jobs "is not straightforward." The White House drew a box around the section so it would stand out among the 417 pages of statistics.

    "When a fast-food restaurant sells a hamburger, for example, is it providing a 'service' or is it combining inputs to 'manufacture' a product?" the report asks.

    "Sometimes, seemingly subtle differences can determine whether an industry is classified as manufacturing. For example, mixing water and concentrate to produce soft drinks is classified as manufacturing. However, if that activity is performed at a snack bar, it is considered a service."

    The report notes that the Census Bureau's North American Industry Classification System defines manufacturing as covering enterprises "engaged in the mechanical, physical or chemical transformation of materials, substances or components into new products."

    Classifications matter, the report says, because among other things, they can affect which businesses receive tax relief. "Suppose it was decided to offer tax relief to manufacturing firms," the report said. "Because the manufacturing category is not well defined, firms would have an incentive to characterize themselves as in manufacturing. Administering the tax relief could be difficult, and the tax relief may not extend to the firms for which it was enacted."

    David Huether, chief economist for the National Association of Manufacturers, said he had heard that some economists wanted to count hamburger flipping as manufacturing, which he noted would produce statistics showing more jobs in what has been a declining sector of the economy.

    "The question is: If you heat the hamburger up are you chemically transforming it?" Mr. Huether said.

    His answer? No.

    This will be sure to have a detrimental effect on re-election.
     
  2. kcmcdonald
    Online

    kcmcdonald Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    the manufacturing unions never vote rep. they always vote dem. And Johnny burgermaker really could care less if his job is reclassafied. He's not going to see more or less money on the reclasifacation of his work. As far as he's conserned he is a burger flipper. This will do nothing to the reelection of Bush. I and bet you're the only one who read this report. Mabey not the only one but one of the few who have.
     
  3. AtlantaWalter
    Offline

    AtlantaWalter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2003
    Messages:
    479
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    small cave outside Atlanta
    Ratings:
    +3
    I cannot believe that the government can't find something better to do than worry about the job classification of a burger-flipper.

    I suppose it's one way for the feds to justify an ever growing and increasingly non-productive governmental monster that seeks to control all and accomplish nothing.
     
  4. acludem
    Offline

    acludem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Messages:
    1,500
    Thanks Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    Missouri
    Ratings:
    +69
    Bush will stoop to any length to help his economic record. I guess we can reclassify his press and intelligence departments as manufacturing jobs as well...they certainly have produced some Whoppers haven't they?

    acludem
     
  5. rtwngAvngr
    Offline

    rtwngAvngr Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    15,755
    Thanks Received:
    511
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +511
    The economy is growing. That's a fact. It's due to tax cuts. Deal.
     
  6. kcmcdonald
    Online

    kcmcdonald Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    I don't know if you watch the news but the Bush admiistration is not paradeing around as the champion of manufacturing jobs. Infact they support the outsourceing of that sector of the economy. The fact that burger king is being reclassified is out of defintion not nessisity. Digging at straws ACLUDEM!!
     
  7. MtnBiker
    Offline

    MtnBiker Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2003
    Messages:
    4,327
    Thanks Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Rocky Mountains
    Ratings:
    +230
    I'm not completely sure about this scenerio but I believe recently some manufacturing facilities (such as Micron) that operated foodservice within their facilities were classified as manufacturing jobs. However many of the foodservice operations were contracted out to companies like Marriot, typically using the same employees doing the same job. Then those jobs were reclassified to service jobs, thus added to the loss of manufacturing jobs, but no actually job loss occured.
     

Share This Page