Bravo Ron Paul!

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by Bfgrn, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    End Insanity Of The War on Drugs—Start With
    Decriminalizing Marijuana at The Federal Level


    Published: Tuesday, 20 Apr 2010 | 12:00 AM ET Text Size

    Commentary & Analysis

    [​IMG]
    Ron Paul
    U.S. Congressman (R-Texas)
    Two-time Presidential Candidate
    Physician, Obstetrics & Gynecology


    In light of the recent drug-related violence in Mexico, it is appropriate to reflect on how our current prohibition laws affect crime, law enforcement and the economy.

    Many will have the knee-jerk reaction of wanting to see more of a crackdown on illegal drugs. But I have to ask: Haven't we been cracking down on drugs for several decades only to see the black market flourish and the violence escalate? Could there be a more effective approach?

    The illegality of drugs is, in fact, the Number One factor that keeps profits up for dealers and cartels, and ensures that organized crime dominates the market.

    Cocaine, for example, has about a 17,000-percent markup and sells for more than gold in some areas. This is nothing new or unique to drugs, but a predictable outcome of prohibition.

    During alcohol prohibition, Al Capone and others involved in organized crime made fortunes taking advantage of the dangerous and lucrative underground market the laws had created. Every time law enforcement makes another bust, profits rise for the remaining suppliers. These types of economic forces are insurmountable for law enforcement, but make for very good business for dealers and cartels.

    "The illegality of drugs is the number one factor that keeps profits up for dealers and cartels, and ensures that organized crime dominates the market."
    For the rest of us, however, it is a disaster. The war on drugs keeps our prisons full to bursting at great expense to taxpayers, but also at great danger to the public at large when the real criminals, the murderers, the rapists, the child molesters, are let out to make room for non-violent drug offenders.

    We imprison more of our population per capita than Russia or China ever have, and yet criminals like Philip Garrido (Jaycee Lee Dugard's kidnapper) are out there able to rape and kidnap again and again. (It is interesting that in his case, a little marijuana caught the attention of law enforcement more than repeated reports from neighbors of children in his backyard).

    The War on Drugs skews the priorities of law enforcement to the detriment of the public.

    Repeal of alcohol prohibition certainly did organized crime no favors. So too today, if we wanted to pull the rug out from under violent drug cartels, create legitimate job opportunities in place of the black market, realign the priorities of law enforcement, and make room in prison for the people that ought to be there, we need to end the insanity of the War on Drugs.

    Decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level would be a start.

    2011 CNBC.com

    People crushed by laws, have no hope but to evade power. If the laws are their enemies, they will be enemies to the law; and those who have most to hope and nothing to lose will always be dangerous.
    Edmund Burke
     
  2. Mad Scientist
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    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    For the past 30 years I've supported the War on Drugs but I have to admit now it's not working. Time to legalize a host of drugs, Marijuana for starters.
     
  3. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Start with pot and see what happens. You can basically make it up to states to determine the legality.

    Prohibition is not working. its time to try something else. Enforcing laws that many people break also leads to a general lack of respect for the law.
     
  4. tonystewart1
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    tonystewart1 VIP Member

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    I have to agree with Ron Paul on this one. The war on drugs has turned on us. The harder we crack down on drugs the higher the profits for drug dealers.

    Something different does need to done. I am not sure about a whole sale legalization of all drugs. Pot should be legalized and sold by the state like VA does with alchohol. As for coke, smack, and other "hard drugs" they need to remain criminalized.
     
  5. FuelRod
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    FuelRod Gold Member

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    De-criminalizing Pot is a good idea.
    Ending the "war on drugs" or whatever you want to call it on manufactured drugs like cocaine and meth is another argument entirely.
     
  6. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I don't agree with Ron Paul on much, but I agree on this

    The war on drugs does not work. It is a victimless crime that causes a lot of real crime in fighting over the money to be made
     
  7. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Start with Pot, Shrooms and stuff like Ecstasy. Those are the most common drugs used by non abusers and people who are normally otherwise functional members of society.
     
  8. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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  9. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Marijuana is a political LITMUS test.

    Basically asking if you support the violation of people's civil rights to smoke what they want is the sotto voce way of asking:

    "Will you buy into whatever we do no matter how obviously stupid and evil it is?"

    It certainly comes as no surprise to me that NiXXon elected to ignore his own panel of experts and make marijuana a class A drug when they were proposing that it ought to be completely decriminalized

    He knew that his detractors (the, then, young boomers) smoked dope, so the continue repression of people (not the durg, the PEOPLE) who smoked suited his own perverted sense of justice.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
  10. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Nixon Tapes Reveal Twisted Roots Of Marijuana Prohibition

    White House Conversations Reveal Prejudices, Culture War Behind Nixon's Drug War


    Washington, DC: "We need, and I use the word 'all out war,' or all fronts . . . ." That was Richard Nixon's reaction to his national commission's recommendation that marijuana no longer be a criminal offense, according to Nixon's Oval Office tapes. The year after Nixon's "all out war" marijuana arrests jumped by over 100,000 people.

    Highlights of Nixon comments on marijuana:

    * Jews and marijuana: "I see another thing in the news summary this morning about it. That's a funny thing, every one of the bastards that are out for legalizing marijuana is Jewish. What the Christ is the matter with the Jews, Bob, what is the matter with them? I suppose it's because most of them are psychiatrists . . ."

    * Marijuana and the culture wars: "You see, homosexuality, dope, immorality in general. These are the enemies of strong societies. That's why the Communists and the left-wingers are pushing the stuff, they're trying to destroy us."

    * Marijuana compared to alcohol: marijuana consumers smoke "to get high" while "a person drinks to have fun." Nixon also saw marijuana leading to loss of motivation and discipline but claimed: "At least with liquor I don't lose motivation."

    * Marijuana and political dissent: ". . . radical demonstrators that were here . . . two weeks ago . . . They're all on drugs, virtually all."

    * Drug education: "Enforce the law, you’ve got to scare them."
     

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