Body Check: System by System

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by Adam's Apple, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Body Check
    By Shari Rudavsky, The Indianapolis Star
    December 13, 2005

    It's your body, and you've got just one. Cars, kitchen appliances, even hair dryers and irons come with user manuals. Not our bodies.

    Here are some quick hits of the closest thing to a medical consensus on what you need to know and do to keep your body as healthy as possible. Keep in mind, though, that not all doctors agree on what screenings should be done and how often. This, like the owner's manual you keep in your car's glove compartment and rarely consult, is just a general guideline.

    Heart
    What You Can Do: Exercise regularly and watch your weight. Avoid foods high in cholesterol and saturated fats. Eat a varied diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products. Limit your sodium intake to 2,400 milligrams or less a day and have no more than one serving of alcohol a day if you're a woman, two if you're a man.

    What Your Doctors Can Do: Screen you for high blood pressure at least every two years and more regularly if you're at risk for hypertension. Do periodic cholesterol levels for healthy men 35 or older and healthy women 45 or older. For people with additional risk factors, start younger and check more often.

    Sources: American Heart Association, National Heart Lung Blood Institute, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American College of Physicians

    Lungs
    What You Can Do: If you smoke, quit. If you have an underlying lung disorder, such as asthma, or are 50 or older, ask your doctor about having a flu shot every year. If you're older than 65 or have certain health conditions like heart or lung disease, AIDS, diabetes or sickle cell, consider the pneumococcal vaccine to protect against a deadly pneumonia.

    What Your Doctors Can Do: If you smoke, ever smoked, have chronic respiratory distress, or are exposed to workplace irritants, you may want to undergo a simple breathing test, called spirometry, that can tell if your breathing is normal or if you may have early stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

    Sources: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Lung Health Education Program

    Bones
    What You Can Do: Get the recommended daily amounts of calcium and vitamin D, and regularly do weight-bearing exercise. Adults ages 19 to 50 should get 1,000 mg of calcium a day, and pregnant women should have between 1,200 and 1,500 mg daily. Postmenopausal women and all adults 65 or older should consume 1,500 mgs daily. All adults should consume between 400 and 800 international units of vitamin D daily. While osteoporosis is more common in women, men are not immune.

    What Your Doctor Can Do: If you are a postmenopausal woman younger than 65, with one or more osteoporosis risk factors -- such as smoking, a thin frame or a history of fractures -- have a bone mass measurement or bone mineral density test to make sure you're not at risk. All women older than 65 should undergo this test every other year.

    Sources: National Osteoporosis Foundation, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Institutes of Health

    Stomach/Colon
    What You Can Do: Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods to prevent stomach or colon cancer. Some studies suggest that folic acid and calcium also help prevent colorectal cancer, while limiting red meat consumption may lower the risk of stomach cancer.

    What Your Doctor Can Do: Starting at age 50, have an annual stool blood test and/or have a flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years. Another alternative is a colonoscopy every 10 years.

    Sources: American Heart Association, American Cancer Society

    Sex Organs
    What You Can Do: Practice safe sex.

    What Your Doctor Can Do: Women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam at least every three years. Women 40 and older should have a mammogram every 12 to 33 months. Women should be screened for cervical cancer with a Pap smear at least every three years after becoming sexually active or turning 21.

    Men older than 50 should consider having a prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test and digital rectal exam annually to check for prostate cancer. Men at high risk -- blacks and those with a family history -- should consider starting at 45.

    Sources: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American Cancer Society

    http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051213/living01/512130381&...
     
  2. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Sometimes Uncle Ferd gets Granny's blood pressure boilin'...

    Cyclical Blood Pressure Patterns Could Offer Critical Health Clues
    December 12, 2012 — Cyclical patterns in our blood pressure offer clues about risks to our health, according to a medical researcher who first proposed the unorthodox idea that our bodies respond to the natural cycles of day and night, not the hours on a clock.
     
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Prostate cancer rates set to rise...

    Men's cancer risk 'to climb to one in two'
    18 December 2012 - Experts are working on better tests for prostate cancer
     
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Melanoma fights off immune system...
    :eusa_eh:
    Skin cancer 'able to fight off body's immune system'
    1 March 2013 - A deadly form of skin cancer is able to fend off the body's immune system, UK researchers have found.
     
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    This research links sections of the "fat gene" with obesity...
    :confused:
    Fat gene 'linked with skin cancer'
    4 March 2013 - A gene previously shown to be linked to obesity may also increase the risk of a deadly form of skin cancer, say researchers writing in Nature Genetics.

     

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