Blackberry cobbler

Discussion in 'Food & Wine' started by koshergrl, Aug 18, 2018.

  1. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    It's good, but it's different than what I think of when I think of cobbler. I like the cake to be very sweet. And that doesn't even have sugar in it..it's rich in butter...but no sugar.
     
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  2. froggy
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    froggy Gold Member

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  3. OldLady
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    OldLady Diamond Member

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    I've never had huckleberries, but I remember bringing back to Connecticut wild blueberries from a visit to Maine, and my neighbor INSISTED that what I had brought back were huckleberries.

    You can tell the huckleberries from the wild blueberries by the size of the plant, I guess, and most definitely by the leaves. The berries do LOOK almost identical. I don't know if there is a big difference in flavor. Have any of you tried them? They come frozen now. I do NOT mean those big bloated cultivated blueberries the size of a marble. I mean wild blueberries.
    I hear they also grow in one small area on the northwestern coast, too. Can't remember where.
     
  4. Pogo
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    Pogo Diamond Member

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    What Koshergrl pictured look like huckles to me. They're very definitely much tastier than bloobs. The foliage often looks virtually identical although size is hard to compare, as there are both expansive and low-growing varieties of each; I remember picking the low bloobs in Maine and in my spot up here I've got both low-growing and high-growing huckles side by side. On the other hand I have a bloob in the back yard about eight feet high, so I don't think size of the plant is an indicator.

    You can plant blueberries where you want of course but AFAIK you can't intentionally plant/transplant huckles. Nature has to do it.
     

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